Smile, You’re On Video-Conference! Overcoming Obstacles When Job Interviewing

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By Karen Friedman

In today’s competitive job market, companies are looking for ways to save money when interviewing prospective job candidates.  For many, that means being interviewed by satellite or video conference versus a trip to the home office.  How can you shine?  What do you need to know about making a good impression from miles away?

It’s all the rage especially if your company is doing a little belt tightening and you can score some points by saving a few bucks. Instead of paying for travel expenses and spending your free time whining and dining a lot of potential job candidates, what about speeding up the time consuming process by conducting the interview during a videoconference that is inexpensive by comparison? Companies can save time until they’ve narrowed the search and job seekers can try to impress without traveling to all corners of the globe. After all, universities offer videoconference lecture series and companies frequently use the technology to hold global meetings. In fact, a study on web conferencing quoted in HR Magazine shows the market jumping nearly 300 percent between 2005 and 2011, to $2.9 billion. So clearly, the technology is certainly gaining popularity. The question is: to whose advantage?

While there are clearly benefits, from where I sit as a communications coach, there are also a host of barriers that prevent job candidates from feeling at ease and making their best impression. How can you possibly connect with someone and make them feel who you really are if you can’t shake their hand and look them directly in the eye? It’s like buying a car without taking it for a test drive. Given that first impressions are critical, if the job applicant is unfamiliar with the technology, appears nervous or looks off, then decision makers may form incorrect impressions. Then there’s the lighting issue. If the lighting isn’t good, the applicant can look pasty or washed out. Additionally, there are often delays as video and audio are compressed and transmitted between locations. So, that means people unknowingly talk over each other or try to fill the silence without realizing that those on the other end of the connection are still listening to someone’s response. On the other side of the screen, interviewers often forget that they are also visible and need to make a good impression. That means no slouching, checking e-mail; leafing through magazines and making potential employees feel as if they’re boring you.

Like any interview or presentation, the key to success is for both sides to prepare in advance. The first step would be to set up a phone call and talk about videoconferencing etiquette.

PHONE PRIMERS – Before the interview, the company should schedule a phone call with the applicant to explain video protocol. For example, tell them how the room will be set up, who will be there, where to look, how wide the video image will be or what technical issues could arise. Can they interrupt? Who will hear them? Will there be feedback or delay time? What’s the format and how much time will they have? It’s up to the company to send a message that says they want the interview to be successful for the prospect.

THINK TV – Appearing for a video interview is a bit like being on TV. You have to connect with people you can’t see so it’s important to engage your audience quickly. In most cases, you want to look directly into the camera so you seem completely attentive to the people on the other side of the screen. The trick is to appear natural and not over focus on the camera which is very hard for an untrained person to do. Instead, pretend that camera is one person. As a former television reporter, I used to speak to more than one million people every evening. By pretending the camera was my Mom or a friend, it was easier to speak from the heart and focus on the information I wanted to convey. It’s also important to gesture and use your hands so you’re animated, but movements can be magnified on the screen so aim for smaller, smoother movements.

DRESS FOR SUCCESS – What looks good in your mirror doesn’t always translate to the big screen. The number one rule is to wear what makes you feel good as long as it doesn’t distract from your message. For women, that means leaving big earrings, frilly tops and clunky jewelry at home. But putting on some lipstick, eyeliner and a little blush will prevent you from looking washed out. Both sexes should avoid small patterns like checks and tweeds which can “bleed” on screen. As for colors, warm bright colors typically look great, but if that’s not your style, think contrast such as a white shirt with a navy blazer as opposed to just a white shirt. And men, a viewer’s eye will go straight to your tie, so make it a good one! Finally, find out what the background is. If you’re up against a green screen and you wear green, oops, you’ll disappear.

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT – Set up a video camera and practice with a pal who can ask you questions and offer feedback. Play it back and check your body language, expressions and pace. Are you talking too fast? Are you speaking loud enough? Do you look friendly and approachable?

While videoconferencing should not replace face to face interviewing, as technology gets easierScience Articles, so will video interviewing. And the job of tomorrow may very well come down to the person who seems at ease on camera.

 

The ABC’s of Writing a Competitive LinkedIn Profile

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By Gordon Walter

A LinkedIn profile can be beautifully written, with perfect grammar/punctuation/prose and be ignored entirely by hiring professionals.  Following are primary considerations for job seekers when writing a LinkedIn profile that is more likely to attract the right kind of attention and get results.

Achievement Emphasis.  Employers are naturally searching for the best.  The great thing about LinkedIn is sometimes the job comes to you.  With this in mind, you must think of your profile as a marketing tool to promote your performance successes in the summary and experience sections.  Even if in your modesty all you can think of is that you had excellent attendance, then highlight it.  You know that it will be music to some employer’s for whom attendance is a keyword.

Appearance.  There are two significant ways in which a LinkedIn summary will be viewed: desktop or mobile.  Depending on which platform, only so many characters will appear on the profile summary:

  • Desktop: the first 220 characters are immediately visible, with the rest requiring a user click on “View More.”
  • Mobile: the first 92 characters are immediately visible.

Because viewers will need to take an extra step to see this other content, each of those first 220 and 92 characters are critical: 58 percent of LinkedIn’s users are viewing it via mobile (LinkedIn 2016 Q1 quarterly results), so maximizing the impact of those first 92 characters is especially important.

These two broad categories are technically further divisible by platform: on the desktop, what web browser (Chrome, Firefox, Edge/IE, or Safari) is used; on mobile, which OS (Android, iOS or Windows) applies.  Sometimes, website information is not displayed uniformly on each platform, OS, or screen size. However, differences are likely to be minor and, in the vast majority of cases, hard to notice.

Authentic. Don’t be afraid to communicate something authentic and personal, while remaining positive: this can make a substantial difference.

Blog Leverage.  If you have a WordPress-type blog, it is good to feed it into your profile (unless, of course, the content is not in alignment with LinkedIn.  To enable this setting, select “More” in the main navigation bar, then select “Applications.” From there, choose the WordPress application and enter the link to your feed.  The blog will then appear in your profile and will update each time a new post is added.

Buzzwords.  What do the words responsible, creative, effective, analytical, strategic, patient, expert, organizational, driven, and innovative have in common? They are on LinkedIn’s list of the most overused buzzwords on their site.  If you look closely, these words are not likely to be keywords and therefore can be readily replaced.  The text will read and sound more alive with the use of such words minimized.

Connections – Play The Numbers.  Maintaining 50 or fewer connections on LinkedIn tells recruiters one of three things: A. You do not know many people; B. You avoid connecting with others, or C. Technology and social media are not your “thing.”  None of these have a good connotation.  It is not at all necessary to have many hundreds of connections to have an effective network.  LinkedIn recommends approximately 200-250 people is a connections “sweet spot.”

Current Job – Even When There Is None.  Since many recruiters search exclusively using the “Current Title” box to search for candidates; you should create a job listing in the current section that includes the job title(s) you’re targeting, e.g., “Full-Time Student/Financial Analyst in Training.  This should be followed by a phrase such as “In Transition” or “Seeking New Position” in the Company Name box.

Discretion.  People are often fearful of doing anything on LinkedIn because their employer may find out.  Settings can be adjusted, so your boss doesn’t see it.  The privacy settings are easy to find:  sign in, and click “settings” in the drop-down menu, where your name appears in the upper right-hand corner, and make the appropriate selection.

Endorsements.  Endorsements can be a great way to highlight skills, as long as your profile isn’t top-heavy with too many.  Keeping your skills updated.  As new skills are developed, or new responsibilities are added, drop the somewhat outdated skills and add the ones you want to be known for.  Visitors to your page, will then only see the most relevant skills.

Enthusiasm – Is Contagious.  People who are energized are more exciting and can come across as having much to contribute.  Ensure profile shows interest.  Join and participate in groups related to your profession.  Use “Status” line to announce what you are doing professionally.  Share articles, news, and relevant updates.  Connect with recognized industry leaders.  It all works to attract good attention and to build your “Brand.”

Findable.  Do not neglect to add your contact information (e.g., email address (or blog, or Twitter handle, etc.), to the contact information section of your resume.

First Person.  First-person should not be used on a resume, but it is OK to use it on LinkedIn.  As previously stated, never use third-person.

Fit.  When hiring for permanent positions, hiring managers and other decision-makers have a strong preference for prospective employees who are a good fit; those who can comfortably fit into the organization’s culture.  Some places are of a more laid-back character and prefer people to work collaboratively.  Other places are comfortable with confrontation when views differ.  Others still will prioritize individual initiative to a greater or lesser extent.

As you know, every recruiter and many hiring managers have questions they ask to gauge how strong culture fit a candidate may be, with those less strong a fit being weeded out by those questions.  But as importantly: recruiters are fed up with all of the “detail-oriented,” “motivated” professionals.  Those catchphrases appear far too many times in far too many cases where these terms do not apply.

Groups.  LinkedIn Groups are an excellent source of education as well as job search activity. Joining a group relevant to your profession/industry shows that you are engaged in your career.  Also, you will forge connections to people and some relevant discussions to keep you informed and up-to-date.

Headline.  The headline doesn’t have to be job title and company.  Be innovative by using headline space to briefly showcase your specialty or value-added.  The more specific you can be about what sets you apart from the competition, the better.

Job Description.  Look at job descriptions of targeted positions, and insert them into a word cloud tool like “Wordle.”  See which words stand out.  They are likely what recruiters are searching for.  Make sure those words and phrases are sprinkled throughout summary and experience.

Keywords – Which Ones?  Identifying the right keywords to use in your LinkedIn profile summary can seem a bit overwhelming, but there are resources available to help find them:

  • Organization Charts. If there is a more senior, well-respected professional in your field, look at that person’s LinkedIn profile (Use LinkedIn Search function to locate).  Copy/paste his or her summary into your favorite word cloud site (Wordle.net is a popular one) and see what keywords are most prominent.  Do the same with the summary you are currently using, and compare the results.  Repeat this process with others, and a pattern should emerge.
  • Job Advertisements. Job advertisements are also content that is job-oriented and keyword-based and hence is also a great resource.  Once you identify the targeted job title for your search, look at job advertisements for the job title and its variations.  I copy/paste this text into a Word document.  Those words/phrases that are repeated are the keywords.
  • It goes without saying, but keywords of behavior, skills, and attributes that do not apply to someone’s experience cannot be used.  Also, a great profile not only has the right keywords but is also appealing to a human reader. Take the time to pull the keywords and the narrative together, so your profile is engaging and easy to read.

This list of keywords should then be the framework upon which the resume and profile are written.  Any skills, accomplishments, etc. that do not align with this keyword list should be considered of secondary importance and therefore not included.

Keywords – Work In LinkedIn.  When writing a resume, the intended audience is another person, but when it comes to a LinkedIn profile, the writing is more for search engines.  Recruiters and others search LinkedIn to find talent matching their needs, so the right keywords turning up in these search results is necessary.  There is an entire science to this discipline: search engine optimization.

Although the specifics of search engine optimization (SEO) are very technical, the concept is a simple one: keywords and their variations.  Anyone who has used a search engine understands how important the search terms can be.  And for the same reason, these keywords are highly relevant in a job search.

Multimedia.  LinkedIn permits adding photos, videos, and slideshows to your profile summary.  Instead of just talking about your work, you can show examples. As long as information shared is not proprietary to the employer, is OK to use.  If something might be legally protected, you can create a sample presentation on a relevant topic that shows your communication and presentation abilities.  Such material can make the profile way more interesting to read and prompt an employer to want to know more.

Numbers.  Highlight past results in summary, and when possible, include numbers and case studies that prove success.  Do not underestimate the power of a few key statistics to impress a reader.

Overdoing.  As LinkedIn offers a growing list of cool features and functionality, it is tempting to take “some of each.”  As with many other things in life, the Law of Diminishing Returns can apply to LinkedIn.  Invite others to assess your profile and give feedback.  If it appears to be a bit too much, then less can be more.  Remember, if, in a job search mode, you want your future employer to see the behaviors, skills, and abilities you have to offer in relationship to how they will help them.  You do not want that central message “lost in the lights.”

People – Known To You.  There is some inherent risk in accepting requests to connect with people you do not know.  Social risks aside, if enough people reject your request and say they do not know you, it is possible that LinkedIn will shut down your account.

Personalize.  Even though the profile is LIKE a resume, in other ways is not a resume.  Confusing?  Yes, a little.  The profile should be written as if in a conversation, so is perfectly reasonable to insert something of whom you are, your personality.  Things like values and passions are permissible to mention, though always when in alignment with the keyword list for targeted positions, industry, etc.  Therefore it is OK to mention the part of you that exists outside the workplace.  However, I tend to steer clear of listing activities that could be offensive to some people/organizations.  Your call whether to include something and if in doubt, go for it.

Photo.  Choose a clear, friendly, and professional image.  Look at what people in your targeted company, industry sector or business level are wearing.  Some professionals recommend showing yourself in an “action” photo in an appropriate work setting.  A good photo can convey passion, energy, charisma, empathy, and other soft skills that are hard to describe in writing.

Recommendations.  Do not shrink from asking people for a recommendation on LinkedIn.   And, it is OK to specify what you’d like them to focus on in their statement.  Getting generic recommendations are not as helpful as something more specific, that happens to align with a keyword(s) and if possible can include a metric (i.e., dollars, percent, numerical values, etc.).

Resume – Like A.  Someone’s resume isn’t merely a list of job duties, but is a place to highlight the behaviors, skills, and accomplishments the candidate has that the company needs.  The same considerations should go for the LinkedIn profile.  For example, the experience section must contain bullet points that accurately showcases the who, what, when, why and how of your career.

Summary.  The summary should be 3–5 short paragraphs long, preferably with a bulleted section in the middle.  It should cover work passions, key skills, unique qualifications, and a list of the various industries worked within over the years.

Unwanted Recommendations.  If you get a recommendation that is not well written or is unsolicited, you can hide the recommendation instead.  Select “Profile,” then “Edit Profile,” then “Manage” (when at the relevant position).  Uncheck the box next to the recommendation that you want to hide, and click “Save Changes.”

Update Status.  Status can be updated as often as you wish. Update it professionally and strategically (articles recently read or written, etc.), and as often as weekly.  The entire group of connections will see the updates, both in news feeds and in the weekly LinkedIn network updates emails.

URL.  It’s much easier to publicize your profile with a customized URL (ideally linkedin.com/name), rather than the clunky combination of numbers that LinkedIn automatically assigns when you sign up. To get one:  On “Edit Profile” screen, at the bottom of gray window showing your basic information, you’ll see “Public Profile URL.  Click “Edit” next to the URL, and specify what you’d like your address to be. When  finished, click “Set Custom URL.”

Volunteerism, Languages, Special Accomplishments.  Were you a member of the U.S. Olympic team, or play professional sports?  Do you possess relevant certification?  Volunteer for an organization?  Speak another language?  If so, including such information on the left when editing your profile is a great way to showcase those unique skills and experiences that make you stand out from other candidates.

Welcoming.  Showcase the positive attributes about you, with your target reader in mind.  Help them get to know you at a high level.  Think about first impressions.  Craft it in the first-person.  Do not come across as pretentious. Keep your brand message in mind and realize that LinkedIn is a platform designed for interaction.

Work Experiences – Ditto.  (See Multimedia.)  The same principle applies to each work experience item.  Add links to company websites, projects worked on, articles drafted, or anything else that provides a better, more comprehensive view of your work

Writer – Be A.  LinkedIn now permits users to write and publish their work on the platform. Share perspectives about news in your profession, or tell a story that showcases writing and communication skill.

LinkedIn is only a tool.  Like most tools, it needs to be used, be controlled, and be recognized as an investment to be most effective.  This list may seem daunting at first, so be methodical and establish a goal of addressing a set number of items per day, and per week until completed.  Seek help from YouTube tutorials, from LinkedIn, and from friends.  Will this effort make any difference concerning your job search?  You may be surprised at the outcomes.

The 3 Biggest Mistakes Teens Make When Trying to Get a Job

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By Stu Schaefer 

As an employer, I interview a lot of folks… and a lot of teens. I hate to say it, but teens usually have no clue how to interview and get a job! They blow it!

This article will address the three mistakes most teens make so that you or your kid can learn how to get your favorite job.

  1. Resume

I would say about 8 out of 10 kids drop off a resume with misspellings. This is the FASTEST way for the resume to be thrown in the trash!

In addition, most resumes look like someone just spit a bunch of information into a template and hit print. The information is rarely organized and often unformatted. The result is a messy-looking resume with misspellings that gets thrown in the trash before there’s even a chance to interview.

Here are a few keys for a good resume:

  1. Triple check spelling!
  2. Don’t add an objective. Rather, write a couple of sentences explaining why you’re different and HOW you would help the company.
  3. List the jobs you’ve had… and how you impacted the company rather than just the job. I don’t care that you were a pizza delivery person. What did you do different that helped the company?
  4. List your education at the bottom because it’s not as important.
  5. Contain your resume to ONE piece of paper – front side ONLY. Most people don’t want to read a lot, and multiple pages just makes things difficult.
  1. Follow-up

OK, let’s say you submitted a great resume… that’s the least of your worries now. Many companies won’t call you back.

I don’t call anyone back. Why? Because I want to see if they’ll take the initiative and call me. I want to know if they’re a go-getter and willing to be persistent.

Most people never call back!

The call-back is very simple. All you have to do is ask if they received your resume. When they say yes, simply say “Great! Well I’d love to set up a time to interview.”

Maybe they’re actively looking for employees so they will set up an interview. Maybe they want resumes because they want to have some people ready to call IN CASE they need someone. In that case they might tell you they’re not hiring.

Ask to interview anyway. Tell them you understand, but you want to meet them so they know who you are in case they need someone.

If someone called me and said that… I might even hire them and replace one of my employees that wasn’t doing a good job. That kind of call shows initiative and demonstrates that you would be a great worker.

  1. Dress & Presentation

So now you have the interview… big deal. Most kids blow their chances because they dress terrible – They wear a tank-top, shorts, and flip flops to the interview.

Even though that might be standard clothing for most teens, it creates a bad first impression. As an employer, we think, “Oh no, this kid is unprofessional. They’re probably not a good fit.”

You just made a great phone impression, so you need to reinforce that with a good visual impression. Make sure you wear a collared shirt, either slacks or khakis, and some nice shoes. Women should wear the same thing or a nice dress that isn’t too short.

his will set you apart from the other kids applying, and it will leave a great impression with the employer… HELLO JOB!

In addition to dressing well… always remember to sit tall and speak well. Make eye contact and answer questions confidently.

When you slouch, chomp gum, or look around, it makes you look dumb and unqualified.

There you have it! If you can make these simple changes, you will make yourself much more valuable to the employer and be more likely to get the job you want!

Prepare your kid to nail the job interview!

Check out this free lesson and video tutorial that will explain, step-by-step how to get the job and set yourself apart from the other applicants!

https://preparemykid.com/lesson/nailing-any-job-interview/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Stu_Schaefer/2447706

Delete These Useless Words From Your Resume

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By Victoria LoCascio 

For the past 5 years as president of a company that helps clients to ignite their job searches and land their dream jobs, I have reviewed thousands of resumes. Since space is limited on your resume, every word needs to earn its way onto this document because of its importance. Unfortunately, many resumes contain overused or ineffective words that do not add value. Here is a list of the most common offenders that should be immediately removed.

Delete These Useless Words From Your Resume:

  • Successful / Accomplished (do not add adjectives to try to boost your status, instead show that you have been successful through the text written on your résumé)
  • Guru / Ninja / Rock Star (informal and not helpful for keyword purposes)
  • Seasoned (makes one sound old)
  • Honest (this is obvious and does not need to be stated)
  • Results-driven / Results-oriented (explain your specific results under each job position, instead of simply writing results-driven)
  • Driven / Motivated / Passionate / Focused / Hardworking (this is obvious and does not need to be stated)
  • Goal-oriented (give concrete examples using goal numbers to show that you achieved or exceeded your yearly/monthly/weekly goals)
  • Significantly (include concrete numbers or strong text to show the reader your significant results)
  • Go-to person (clearly explain your level of responsibility)
  • Team Player (it is understood that you know how to work with people)
  • Responsible for / Duties include (use more exciting action verbs to explain your responsibilities and duties; Google resume action verbs to find lists of appropriate verbs; and make sure that every bullet under each job description starts with a verb)
  • Familiar (does not convey that you are good at whatever follows)
  • Stay-At-Home Parent (potential employers should not know about your children as it is not relevant to your career)
  • Resume (do not write Resume at the top of your document)
  • Objective (do not write Objective at the top of your document, instead use a career summary section and label it with your current job title)
  • References (do not write References Available Upon Request at the bottom of your document)
  • First-person or Third-person Language (do not use first-person or third-person language, instead use formal resume language to look professional)

Make sure that you carefully proofread your resume to ensure that every word is powerful, specific, and needed. Once you believe everything is perfect, have at least 3 other people read through it to verify that there are no mistakes or unnecessary words.

Victoria LoCascio, president of http://AceYourInterview.com, is a Certified Professional Resume Writer, Certified Employment Interview Professional, Certified Negotiation Expert, Certified SEO Expert, and has master’s degrees in both Leadership and Communication. She specializes in writing powerful resumes, cover letters, and LinkedIn profiles, as well as coaching clients on interviewing skills.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Victoria_LoCascio/2501308

 

Writing A Resume for A First Job

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By Yassine Elkarmoudi 

More and more educational programs are requiring some sort of volunteer work from students these days. If your school is one of them, you have a leg up when writing your resume. Even if you did not earn money for your work, you can list volunteer work on your resume, if only to prove that you have some experience working with others. If you have worked with a specific organization long term, you may want to emphasize that point – many employers worry about first-time employees’ abilities to commit to a position.

3 Easy Steps To An Effective Resume
You need to look closely at the job requirements, and then emphasize those very skills in your resume.

Keep It Short
Keep your resume short and easy to comprehend – after all, you will give a detailed explanation of it during your personal interview. Employers have to go through many resumes to find the ones they find interesting, so make yours stand out from the crowd. Here’s how you can optimize your resume.

A typical employer is likely to spend little more than half a minute on each resume. That’s why perfecting yours is a must; it should be short, eye-catching and promising enough to get them to call you.

Clearly State Your Objectives
Your objective is your ‘goal statement’ – it should be brief, but strong enough to keep the reader interested in reading further. Objectives should be written from the employers’ perspective, detailing how your past experience, skills, and educational qualifications will benefit their organization.

Highlight Your Skills
Broadly outline your skills; keeping it brief will enable you to put your strongest points first. Include soft skills like effective communication, being a team player, and leadership qualities. Also include your technical skills, mentioning how you acquired them.

Highlight your functional area of expertise. Mention any special skills and certifications earned. All of your computer skills are important, as they indicate how versatile you are. However, list your skills sets in the order that meets profile of the position you are seeking.

What if your resume lacks space?
Other activities can also provide a good starting point for a resume. If you’ve been involved with group activities, whether at school or outside it, some of those activities may be able to show an employer that you have potential as an employee. The best activities to list on a resume are those that demonstrate leadership and commitment.

With your first resume, your cover letter sample takes on added importance. The cover letter is your chance to convince a potential employer to take a risk on you – that, despite your inexperience, you will make a good employee. While your resume is just a list of skills, your cover letter should be persuasive. Explain what about your abilities set you apart from all the other applicants out there. If you are trying to be hired for something more than an entry-level position, you will also need to justify your application and show an employer that your lack of experience will not make it harder for you to do a job.

If you maintain a relationship of some sort with your school, you may be able to get help writing or reviewing your resume through your school’s career counseling department. Most schools help current students with job placement issues, such as resume writing, and may extend the courtesy to past students as well.

Of course, any career or educational accomplishments that you mention should be supported by documentation. Be prepared to bring proof of anything contained in your resume if you are granted a personal interview.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Yassine_Elkarmoudi/2480637

 

How to Write an Amazing IT Resume: Get the Interview Every Time

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By Baron Fendler

I have been in the Recruiting field for over 15 years and have never read a more accurate, clear, and easy to follow guide on how to write a resume.
– Kalimar Petitt, Recruiting Manager, IMDb (an Amazon subsidiary)

Just released, a resume book created for IT professionals! Whether you’re looking for your first IT job, or you’re a veteran with years of information technology experience, this book has everything you need.

In How to Write an Amazing IT Resume, you’ll discover:

  • What information to include in your IT resume header (and what to leave off!)
  • How to get your resume past the automated screener
  • Why hiring managers like candidates who wear more than one hat (and how to show that kind of versatility)
  • Specific ways to show that you meet the IT recruiter’s checklist
  • How to write an impressive IT career summary (that short paragraph at the top of your resume)
  • Why stealing bullet points from other resumes doesn’t work (and how to build your own instead!)
  • How to turn basic bullet points into hooks (and 24 real-world IT examples of initial bullets transformed into attention-grabbing hooks)
  • Ways to submit your IT resume that will increase your chance of landing an interview
  • How to demonstrate well-roundedness, that elusive quality that IT hiring managers really notice

This invaluable career guide also includes:

  • 13 outstanding examples of career summaries for almost every type of IT job
  • A comprehensive skills list with over 160 technical, management, business, and life skills
  • 120 impact verbs you can use to start your bullet points
  • Resume grammar rules and formatting guidelines
  • A proofreading checklist so you don’t get torpedoed by common mistakes

How to Write an Amazing IT Resume also contains a dedicated chapter for each core type of IT job. In each of these chapters, we explain exactly what you need to do to sell yourself for that type of job.

Perfect for:

  • IT business analysts
  • Technical analysts
  • Developers / Programmers
  • Web designers
  • IT consultants
  • Helpdesk technicians
  • Systems administrators
  • Network architects
  • Software engineers
  • IT managers and directors

When it comes to resume writing, there is a mountain of misinformation out there. Many other books (and blogs) contain out-of-date, irrelevant, or just plain poor advice. You can try your luck elsewhere. OR you can read this book, which walks through the whole process from A to Z and is endorsed by numerous IT hiring managers and recruiters.

Why not take the next step in your information technology career right now? A resume might be the most important thing you ever write. Order this book today.

tags: how to write a resume, CV writing, resume writing, IT interviewing, job hunting, software development, IT consulting, job search, find a job, career guide, IT management

Sell Yourself In One Page

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Resume writing is a tricky business. On one hand, affording the opportunity to determine precisely the best first impression is invaluable. On the other hand, a single page to make an impression is an anxiety-driven exercise in frustration. [Please do not make your resume multiple pages. Ten years of experience is sufficient and a desired position with have a hundred resumes; you’ll move to the bottom of the pile.] Be disciplined and follow these straightforward tips to get every job you apply for, guaranteed. (Editor’s Note: This publication does not support this guarantee and thinks there are far too many factors to determine anything like this with even remote certainty.)

I will let you in on a few secrets:
1. The perfect resume is unattainable.
2. An attractive resume will not guarantee an interview.
3. Resume writing is, like most endeavors, more Sisyphus than we would like to admit.

Don’t surrender, there are still ways to make it easier and, for secrets one and two, less daunting. As for your own personal boulder, you will have to choose how many times you want to climb the hill…

Relevant work experience coupled with education/training fleshes out a resume very well. Some encourage embellishment to create the veneer of the perfect candidate, but I think it is unnecessary and dishonest. If you don’t speak Cantonese, don’t say you studied the language for four years. Besides, a good hiring manager will see through a facade during the interview and the position will go to someone qualified.

Without a large amount of relevant work experience, a relevant skill set can be emphasized. I have a section of Professional Skills I utilize in my resume. You can point out attributes you possess making you attractive to employers. If you don’t know your professional skills, self-examination is important. You will be asked similar questions in most interviews.

Another focused section to fill out a sparse or meandering resume is a Career Objective. Stating what you are looking for and why at the very top of the page can get right to the point in the way a flashy resume cannot. In addition, the section may be the only complete sentence on your resume. Communication will always be a an envied skill and displaying an ability to write well is a opportunity you would be remiss to pass up.

Having the perfect resume with background and training may still be a hindrance (i.e. Secret #2). The perfect candidate might appear transient and likely to move on to a different position sooner or too expensive for the planned budget of the position. If a hiring manager views you as overqualified, you might be passed over for the interview. This may seem silly, but it happens.

Enthusiasm and a willingness to adopt the policies and procedures of your new company is as valuable if not more valuable than a track record of displaying skills for several places. Youth relies on this truism, but a recent change in fields can offer the same opportunity. Putting yourself out there for the first time or for the first time in a long time takes courage. You showed courage, now take the recognition for it.

If you are looking for a new job or plan to look in the near future, you have not written your resume.

Resumes should be catered to a job (at least a little). The resume you turn in for one company should be altered for the next company and so on and so forth. Downloading the CV or resume templates from Microsoft Word should only serve as a jumping off point. If it was easy to create, it will show and effort matters, especially for the next potential career. If you don’t have time to create a wow-factor resume, you don’t really want a new job. Keep the sections which always impress as your resume evolves and it will be easier to turn on the wow when you need to.

Most of the time, the job description is written by the hiring manager, except in cases of talent pipelining (truly an honorable endeavor and the future of hiring). Knowing this, it is smart to borrow language from the job description and integrate it directly into your resume.

e.g. Seeking a personable teacher, well-versed in Economics with a passion for students.

School Mission: We are an equal-opportunity school with a foundation for teachers. We are expanding and seeking a team to grow with us.

Under Professional Skills, you can write: Passionate about education

As a Career Objective, you can right: Seeking a school with a strong foundation and the potential to grow with a team of like-minded teachers.

Simple, direct and subtle psychological tricks that tell the interviewer during the review, you are the type of candidate they should meet with. If you’re thinking I am above embellishment but not above inspiring projection, you’re right. The psychological shifts attention where it belongs – on how amazing you are. The embellishment puts focus on things you wish were you or what you think they want. I, like your mother, believe you are talented and deserve every opportunity to show how capable you are. Now, type to your heart’s content and practice answering interview questions in the mirror. You’re going to be great!

This article was written by Shan S. Haider. Shan has worked as an English teacher and currently is the head of consulting at Prudential First Egitim. An Istanbul based company responsible for providing foreign teachers to private schools. If you’d like to work as an English teacher overseas and experience a different culture while earning good money then get in touch. you can contact him at shan@prudentialfirst.com. http://www.prudentialfirst.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Shan_S_Haider/2303190

7 Important Questions Every Job Seeker Should Ask Themselves

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By Gordon Walter

Whether you’re just beginning the job hunt or you’ve been searching for months, it’s important to regularly monitor your activities and reevaluate your strategy. Keep your job search on track by asking yourself the following questions throughout the job-search process.

Am I qualified for this position?

Read the job description carefully before you submit an application. Do you meet the core requirements of the role? Only apply to jobs where you possess these must-haves. If your dream job requires a skill you don’t have, brainstorm ways to develop this skill in or out of the office.

Does my resume tell the right story?

Having the right skills is half the battle; having an application that demonstrates your qualifications is the other half. Consider your resume to be part of your personal marketing campaign. It should show potential employers why you are qualified for, and excited about, your target position.

Do I know someone at the company I can talk to?

Studies have shown you are ten times more likely to land a job when your application is accompanied by an employee referral. Search your network before you apply to a position. If your network is stale, it’s time to get out there and make new connections! .

Have I Googled my name this month?

A Jobvite survey found that 93 percent of recruiters are likely to look at a candidate’s social profile. Additionally, 42 percent have reconsidered a candidate based on the content of their online profiles, leading to both positive and negative re-assessments. Regularly monitor and manage your online brand to ensure it supports your goals, rather than sabotaging them.

What have I learned recently?

Whether you’re looking to climb up the corporate ladder or you’re currently unemployed and seeking work, it’s important to continually seek out relevant professional development activities. By learning new technologies, attending workshops and gaining certifications, you are becoming a more attractive candidate and opening yourself up to new networking opportunities.

Have I stepped outside my comfort zone to find new job leads?

Oftentimes job seekers will default to the one job-search method that’s most comfortable to them. However, it’s important to employ multiple methods to find the largest number of relevant job leads. Apply to opportunities online, engage in recruiter activity, and leverage your network.

Am I ready for the interview?

Don’t set foot in the interview room unless you’ve researched the organization and prepared thoughtful questions for the interviewer. Employers want to know that you’ve done your homework and are taking the interview seriously.

 

What Should You Include in a Resignation Letter?

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By ELIZABETH GARONE

I am often asked, “What should I include in my resignation letter?”  The more important question to be asking is what not to include, say the experts. “Less is always more,” says Roy Cohen, a Manhattan-based career counselor and executive coach. “This is not the time to set the record straight. Know that it’s a small world.” By leaving on the best note possible, you also keep open the option for a return to the company should your circumstances change.

By leaving on the best note possible, you keep open the option for a return to the company should your circumstances change.

Rather than airing your grievances with the company, you should set a positive tone from the start, says Marilyn Puder-York, a psychologist and executive coach in the New York metro area. One way to do this is to include a sentence or two at the top that shows your appreciation for the opportunity to work at the company and the experience it has given you.

Small courtesies are also important. This includes giving enough notice: a minimum of two weeks but preferably one month, says Ms. Puder-York, who has seen people give as much as six months, a move that she wouldn’t recommend. “You lose a lot of power and credibility in six months,” she says. Your preferred last day should also be included in the letter.

Both Mr. Cohen and Ms. Puder-York recommend that you don’t list reasons for your resignation, no matter how tempting it might seem. “Once you’ve made the decision to leave, the reasons are superfluous,” says Mr. Cohen. One option is to include the following sentence at the end of your letter: “I would be happy to discuss my reasons for resigning as well as any particular support I can give you during the transition,” suggests Ms. Puder-York.

“Make the letter clear, direct and simple,” she says. “You should always wait to give additional information in a verbal discussion. The letter ends up in your file. You don’t know where it is going to go.”

At some companies, a formal resignation letter may not even be necessary, says Ms. Puder-York. But she still recommends submitting one, equating it with the increasingly rare written thank-you note. “It is the smart, respectful thing to do, and it’s a gracious thing to do if you do it well,” she says.

Find Your Fit: A Practical Guide to Landing a Job You’ll Love

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By Sue Kaiden

You want no, you need a new job. But not just any job. The job. So you polish your resume till it shines. You apply for countless openings, tailoring your message to each. You search for the hidden job market, although it remains very well hidden. And the response? Well, it’s underwhelming. To top things off, maze-like online application systems appear designed to keep you and the perfect job apart. What’s going on?

How people successfully land jobs has changed. You need help from a pro, someone who navigates career data, the labor market, and hot jobs with ease. You want a coach who will tell you what to pursue and what to avoid, and an expert who has mastered job-hunting and career change to offer wisdom gained from experience. What you need is a career coach. Better yet, several.

Expert career coaches contributing to this volume include Lakeisha Mathews, Dan Schwartz, Sheila Margolis, Alisa Cohn, Michelle Riklan, Marie Zimenoff, Laura Labovich, Lynne Williams, Thea Kelley, Jean Juchnowicz, Alan DeBack, Marilyn Feldstein, Vivian Blade, David Hosmer, Barbara Seifert, and Nicole Miller.

Find Your Fit guides you through answering foundational questions like: What do I want to do with my career? Where should I do it? And how do I get there? As you develop a strong sense of self-awareness, you’ll be able to identify the work environment best for you, shape your online identity, and network more effectively by focusing on people instead of openings. You’ll learn about coveted employee referrals, and how to get one at your target company. With the help of experienced career coaches, you’ll be able to handle any kind of interview. And, you’ll become familiar with the pre-employment testing and assessments increasingly common today.

What are you waiting for? Your personal coaching session awaits

The Place for help with Job Interviewing and all aspects of the job search process