Category Archives: Resume Help

Secrets to Finding an Executive Position While Still Employed

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By Erin Kennedy 

Following are highlights from Erin’s article:  “The Secrets to Finding an Executive Position While Still Employed”

Think Outside the “Networking” Box

  • There are many ways to network.
  • The hidden job market is the best way to go about conducting a secret job search.
    • Attending professional events or using the tools offered by LinkedIn, are excellent ways to learn about jobs not yet advertised.
  • Even volunteering or being involved in your community can lead to new opportunities, so being active can move your job search forward as well.

Be Careful When Using LinkedIn

  • Use LinkedIn when searching for a new job.
    • Begin by updating settings.
      • If settings are not updated appropriately, connections may be able to see every change to profile.
    • Remember that co-workers and bosses are often included as members of the Connections network.
    • When working on LinkedIn profile development, alter settings to ensure the wrong people don’t see any changes made.

Strictly Confidential

  • It’s important to keep things under wraps, until ready to go public. Keep things confidential.
    • Use the term “confidential applicant” instead of name, to avoid showing up on the current employer’s search for a new candidate.
    • Not using the company’s name anywhere on the resume is important.

Don’t Use Company Time

  • Job searches should not be done on company time.
    • If your current boss finds out, there’s a chance you could be fired.
    • If a potential employer finds out search was conducted on company time, they may think you’ll do the same to them and not offer you a job.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Erin_Kennedy/161383

Job Search Tips – What Phrases Should You Use on Job Search Sites?

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By Adnan Masood   

If you are looking for a job, you are likely to search online. The good news? There are many job search sites for you to choose from. Aside from the larger and well-known sites, there are also those that are locally run and operated. Regardless of which website you use, how you search is very important. After all, the fastest way to seek employment is to find jobs that you are qualified for.

In terms of searching for job search sites, how can you do this?

Here are three different ways that you can find open positions that you are qualified for online:

Job Search Tip #1 – Search with the Job Title Name.  This is a pretty simple approach, yet it is the best. What position are you looking to find? Is it a retail manager? If so, ideal search phrases include retail management, retail manager, or store manager. Is it a work at home sales position? If so, ideal search phrases include home-based sales, inbound sales rep, work at home sales, and so forth.

Job search sites pull keywords from your search and pair it with keywords inside a job listing. Since a company always labels a job with the title, this method of searching produces the best results.

Job Search Tip #2 – Search with Job Duty.  Another way to find a job on a job search site is to do a search with a duty. For example, a retail worker often must perform sales work, customer service, and checking out customers. Ideal search phrases include customer service, cashier, sales, and so forth.

As previously stated, job search sites pull keywords from your search phrase and attempt to match up those phrases with keywords inside a job listing posted online. While the best results are produced by using a job title, you can search with a job duty instead as well. The only downside is that some duties are similar for a wide range of jobs; therefore, you are likely to get more non-relevant results with this approach.

Job Search Tip #3 – Search with Company Name.  Do you want to work for a specific company? If so, you can also do a search with that company name. If you are looking for a better paying job, this approach is ideal. However, if you are looking for any decent position that will provide a paycheck now, it is best to use one of the above-mentioned options that produce more results.

While this method of searching job sites does work, results are not guaranteed. Why? While a good percentage of companies do include their company name, some like to keep this information hidden. While it won’t hurt to use this method of searching when seeking employment, know that you do have other options. You should use those other options if your search does not produce any results.

So there you have it; you now got a few great suggestions on the different methods of searching when it comes to looking for employment on job search sites.

Guide To Rethinking Resumes

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By Richard N. Bolles

The first resume book from the What Color Is Your Parachute? career guru Richard Bolles.

Resumes get an average of eight seconds of attention before going in the trash—or getting on the shortlist. That’s just one of the findings reported here, as legendary career expert Richard N. Bolles presents new research about resumes in a guide that summarizes everything job-hunters and career-changers need to know about this essential tool.

This timely resource features the latest research on important resume topics such as keywords, soft skills, scanning software, social media, and online posting. Bolles argues that on the basis of what we now know, we need to rethink what a resume is—and how it should be written. He details the words that must be avoided, and the words that must be used, on a resume that wins you interviews.

This slim volume distills a huge amount of information down to its very essence. Armed with tips and shortcuts based on the author’s decades of experience, you can craft a resume and cover letter that will stand out to your dream employers—and increase your chances of getting interviews and landing jobs.

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The 21st Century Job Search

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By Bruce Hurwitz

Bruce Hurwitz has never been afraid of controversy, nor is he hesitant to admit when he is wrong. Accordingly, in The 21st Century Job Search, he revisits his previous comments on such things as wearing large engagement rings to job interviews, his short-lived position as a career coach at a New York university, and coping with discrimination, topics which raised some eyebrows when he originally wrote about them on LinkedIn.

In the book you will learn:

  • How to prepare for an effective job search;
  • How to research prospective employers;
  • How to handle your Internet presence;
  • How to utilize LinkedIn to build your brand and attract employers;
  • How to effectively network – especially if you are shy;
  • How to prepare for surprises;
  • How to correctly read job descriptions to avoid frustration;
  • What really happens to, and how to write, effective cover letters;
  • What really happens to, and how to write, effective resumes;
  • How to properly prepare for phone, video and in-person interviews;
  • What questions to ask, and how to answers questions you will be asked, in interviews;
  • How to follow-up after an interview;
  • About legal and illegal discrimination; and
  • About negotiating, offer letters and resigning.

Hurwitz also tackles the “tough” issues of dealing with a “resume gap,” raising health issues, and how to turn having been a stay-at-home parent or caregiver into an attraction for employers.

But he does not simply tell readers what to do, when possible, he shows them. There is a script, especially for the shy, for effective networking and follow up. Additionally, readers will find sample letters for networking, expressing interest in a company, applying for jobs, thanking interviewers and, his personal favorite, the rejection letter.

While in the book he gives particular advice to veterans, college students, “older” candidates, the long-term unemployed, stay-at-home parents, and caregivers about how to minimize rejection and reduce frustration, and effectively cope with the different stages of a job search, the book is for any job seeker regardless of their circumstances.

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For expert resume help, contact:

Land Your Dream Job Anywhere

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By Mac Prichard

Job hunting is not an innate ability; no one is born with the magical power to land a great job. It is a learned skill that anyone can master with practice. Unfortunately, most people are never taught how to look for a job. High school and college teach us the technical skills to use in our career, but we are never taught the nuts-and-bolts of how to conduct a strategic job search. Instead, we are left mostly to rely on trial and error. That’s the reason this book exists—to outline a proven job-search strategy that actually works. You’ll find a process that results in a faster, less-frustrating job search—one that maximizes your chances of finding a job you love

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For expert resume help, contact: 

10 Words and Terms That Ruin a Resume

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By Charles Purdy, Monster.com Senior Editor*

Your resume needs an update — that is, if your resume is like that of most people, it’s not as good as it could be.  The problem is language:  Most resumes are a thicket of deadwood words and phrases — empty cliches, annoying jargon and recycled buzzwords.  Recruiters, HR folks and hiring managers see these terms over and over again, and it makes them sad.

Wouldn’t you rather make them happy?  It’s time to start raking out your resume, starting with these (and similar) terms.

1. “Salary negotiable.”  Yes, they know.  If you’re wasting a precious line of your resume on this term, it looks as though you’re padding — that you’ve run out of things to talk about.  If your salary is not negotiable, that would be somewhat unusual.  (Still, don’t put that on your resume either.)

2. “References available by request.”  See the preceding comment about unnecessary terms.

3. “Responsible for ______.”  Reading this term, the recruiter can almost picture the C-average, uninspired employee mechanically fulfilling his job requirements — no more, no less.  Having been responsible for something isn’t something you did — it’s something that happened to you.  Turn phrases like “responsible for” into “managed,” “led” or other decisive, strong verbs.

4. “Experience working in ______.”  Again, experience is something that happens to you — not something you achieve.  Describe your background in terms of achievements.

5. “Problem-solving skills.”  You know who else has problem-solving skills? Monkeys.  Dogs.  On your resume, stick to skills that require a human.

6. “Detail-oriented.”  So, you pay attention to details.  Well, so does everyone else.  Don’t you have something unique to tell the hiring manager?  Plus, putting this on your resume will make that accidental typo in your cover letter or resume all the more comical.

7. “Hardworking.”  Have you ever heard the term “show — don’t tell?”  This is where that might apply.  Anyone can call himself a hard worker.  It’s a lot more convincing if you describe situations in concrete detail in which your hard work benefited an employer.

8. “Team player.”  See the preceding comment about showing instead of telling.  There are very few jobs that don’t involve working with someone else.  If you have relevant success stories about collaboration, put them on your resume.  Talk about the kinds of teams you worked on, and how you succeeded.

9. “Proactive.”  This is a completely deflated buzzword. Again, show rather than tell.

10. “Objective.”  This term isn’t always verboten, but you should use it carefully.  If your objective is to get the job you’ve applied for, there’s no need to spell that out on your resume with its own heading.  A resume objective is usually better replaced by a career summary describing your background, achievements and what you have to offer an employer.  An exception might be if you haven’t applied for a specific job and don’t have a lot of experience that speaks to the position you’d like to achieve.

* Used with permission

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The 3 Biggest Mistakes Teens Make When Trying to Get a Job

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By Stu Schaefer 

As an employer, I interview a lot of folks… and a lot of teens. I hate to say it, but teens usually have no clue how to interview and get a job! They blow it!

This article will address the three mistakes most teens make so that you or your kid can learn how to get your favorite job.

  1. Resume

I would say about 8 out of 10 kids drop off a resume with misspellings. This is the FASTEST way for the resume to be thrown in the trash!

In addition, most resumes look like someone just spit a bunch of information into a template and hit print. The information is rarely organized and often unformatted. The result is a messy-looking resume with misspellings that gets thrown in the trash before there’s even a chance to interview.

Here are a few keys for a good resume:

  1. Triple check spelling!
  2. Don’t add an objective. Rather, write a couple of sentences explaining why you’re different and HOW you would help the company.
  3. List the jobs you’ve had… and how you impacted the company rather than just the job. I don’t care that you were a pizza delivery person. What did you do different that helped the company?
  4. List your education at the bottom because it’s not as important.
  5. Contain your resume to ONE piece of paper – front side ONLY. Most people don’t want to read a lot, and multiple pages just makes things difficult.
  1. Follow-up

OK, let’s say you submitted a great resume… that’s the least of your worries now. Many companies won’t call you back.

I don’t call anyone back. Why? Because I want to see if they’ll take the initiative and call me. I want to know if they’re a go-getter and willing to be persistent.

Most people never call back!

The call-back is very simple. All you have to do is ask if they received your resume. When they say yes, simply say “Great! Well I’d love to set up a time to interview.”

Maybe they’re actively looking for employees so they will set up an interview. Maybe they want resumes because they want to have some people ready to call IN CASE they need someone. In that case they might tell you they’re not hiring.

Ask to interview anyway. Tell them you understand, but you want to meet them so they know who you are in case they need someone.

If someone called me and said that… I might even hire them and replace one of my employees that wasn’t doing a good job. That kind of call shows initiative and demonstrates that you would be a great worker.

  1. Dress & Presentation

So now you have the interview… big deal. Most kids blow their chances because they dress terrible – They wear a tank-top, shorts, and flip flops to the interview.

Even though that might be standard clothing for most teens, it creates a bad first impression. As an employer, we think, “Oh no, this kid is unprofessional. They’re probably not a good fit.”

You just made a great phone impression, so you need to reinforce that with a good visual impression. Make sure you wear a collared shirt, either slacks or khakis, and some nice shoes. Women should wear the same thing or a nice dress that isn’t too short.

his will set you apart from the other kids applying, and it will leave a great impression with the employer… HELLO JOB!

In addition to dressing well… always remember to sit tall and speak well. Make eye contact and answer questions confidently.

When you slouch, chomp gum, or look around, it makes you look dumb and unqualified.

There you have it! If you can make these simple changes, you will make yourself much more valuable to the employer and be more likely to get the job you want!

Prepare your kid to nail the job interview!

Check out this free lesson and video tutorial that will explain, step-by-step how to get the job and set yourself apart from the other applicants!

https://preparemykid.com/lesson/nailing-any-job-interview/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Stu_Schaefer/2447706

Delete These Useless Words From Your Resume

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By Victoria LoCascio 

For the past 5 years as president of a company that helps clients to ignite their job searches and land their dream jobs, I have reviewed thousands of resumes. Since space is limited on your resume, every word needs to earn its way onto this document because of its importance. Unfortunately, many resumes contain overused or ineffective words that do not add value. Here is a list of the most common offenders that should be immediately removed.

Delete These Useless Words From Your Resume:

  • Successful / Accomplished (do not add adjectives to try to boost your status, instead show that you have been successful through the text written on your résumé)
  • Guru / Ninja / Rock Star (informal and not helpful for keyword purposes)
  • Seasoned (makes one sound old)
  • Honest (this is obvious and does not need to be stated)
  • Results-driven / Results-oriented (explain your specific results under each job position, instead of simply writing results-driven)
  • Driven / Motivated / Passionate / Focused / Hardworking (this is obvious and does not need to be stated)
  • Goal-oriented (give concrete examples using goal numbers to show that you achieved or exceeded your yearly/monthly/weekly goals)
  • Significantly (include concrete numbers or strong text to show the reader your significant results)
  • Go-to person (clearly explain your level of responsibility)
  • Team Player (it is understood that you know how to work with people)
  • Responsible for / Duties include (use more exciting action verbs to explain your responsibilities and duties; Google resume action verbs to find lists of appropriate verbs; and make sure that every bullet under each job description starts with a verb)
  • Familiar (does not convey that you are good at whatever follows)
  • Stay-At-Home Parent (potential employers should not know about your children as it is not relevant to your career)
  • Resume (do not write Resume at the top of your document)
  • Objective (do not write Objective at the top of your document, instead use a career summary section and label it with your current job title)
  • References (do not write References Available Upon Request at the bottom of your document)
  • First-person or Third-person Language (do not use first-person or third-person language, instead use formal resume language to look professional)

Make sure that you carefully proofread your resume to ensure that every word is powerful, specific, and needed. Once you believe everything is perfect, have at least 3 other people read through it to verify that there are no mistakes or unnecessary words.

Victoria LoCascio, president of http://AceYourInterview.com, is a Certified Professional Resume Writer, Certified Employment Interview Professional, Certified Negotiation Expert, Certified SEO Expert, and has master’s degrees in both Leadership and Communication. She specializes in writing powerful resumes, cover letters, and LinkedIn profiles, as well as coaching clients on interviewing skills.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Victoria_LoCascio/2501308

 

Writing A Resume for A First Job

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By Yassine Elkarmoudi 

More and more educational programs are requiring some sort of volunteer work from students these days. If your school is one of them, you have a leg up when writing your resume. Even if you did not earn money for your work, you can list volunteer work on your resume, if only to prove that you have some experience working with others. If you have worked with a specific organization long term, you may want to emphasize that point – many employers worry about first-time employees’ abilities to commit to a position.

3 Easy Steps To An Effective Resume
You need to look closely at the job requirements, and then emphasize those very skills in your resume.

Keep It Short
Keep your resume short and easy to comprehend – after all, you will give a detailed explanation of it during your personal interview. Employers have to go through many resumes to find the ones they find interesting, so make yours stand out from the crowd. Here’s how you can optimize your resume.

A typical employer is likely to spend little more than half a minute on each resume. That’s why perfecting yours is a must; it should be short, eye-catching and promising enough to get them to call you.

Clearly State Your Objectives
Your objective is your ‘goal statement’ – it should be brief, but strong enough to keep the reader interested in reading further. Objectives should be written from the employers’ perspective, detailing how your past experience, skills, and educational qualifications will benefit their organization.

Highlight Your Skills
Broadly outline your skills; keeping it brief will enable you to put your strongest points first. Include soft skills like effective communication, being a team player, and leadership qualities. Also include your technical skills, mentioning how you acquired them.

Highlight your functional area of expertise. Mention any special skills and certifications earned. All of your computer skills are important, as they indicate how versatile you are. However, list your skills sets in the order that meets profile of the position you are seeking.

What if your resume lacks space?
Other activities can also provide a good starting point for a resume. If you’ve been involved with group activities, whether at school or outside it, some of those activities may be able to show an employer that you have potential as an employee. The best activities to list on a resume are those that demonstrate leadership and commitment.

With your first resume, your cover letter sample takes on added importance. The cover letter is your chance to convince a potential employer to take a risk on you – that, despite your inexperience, you will make a good employee. While your resume is just a list of skills, your cover letter should be persuasive. Explain what about your abilities set you apart from all the other applicants out there. If you are trying to be hired for something more than an entry-level position, you will also need to justify your application and show an employer that your lack of experience will not make it harder for you to do a job.

If you maintain a relationship of some sort with your school, you may be able to get help writing or reviewing your resume through your school’s career counseling department. Most schools help current students with job placement issues, such as resume writing, and may extend the courtesy to past students as well.

Of course, any career or educational accomplishments that you mention should be supported by documentation. Be prepared to bring proof of anything contained in your resume if you are granted a personal interview.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Yassine_Elkarmoudi/2480637

 

How to Write an Amazing IT Resume: Get the Interview Every Time

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By Baron Fendler

I have been in the Recruiting field for over 15 years and have never read a more accurate, clear, and easy to follow guide on how to write a resume.
– Kalimar Petitt, Recruiting Manager, IMDb (an Amazon subsidiary)

Just released, a resume book created for IT professionals! Whether you’re looking for your first IT job, or you’re a veteran with years of information technology experience, this book has everything you need.

In How to Write an Amazing IT Resume, you’ll discover:

  • What information to include in your IT resume header (and what to leave off!)
  • How to get your resume past the automated screener
  • Why hiring managers like candidates who wear more than one hat (and how to show that kind of versatility)
  • Specific ways to show that you meet the IT recruiter’s checklist
  • How to write an impressive IT career summary (that short paragraph at the top of your resume)
  • Why stealing bullet points from other resumes doesn’t work (and how to build your own instead!)
  • How to turn basic bullet points into hooks (and 24 real-world IT examples of initial bullets transformed into attention-grabbing hooks)
  • Ways to submit your IT resume that will increase your chance of landing an interview
  • How to demonstrate well-roundedness, that elusive quality that IT hiring managers really notice

This invaluable career guide also includes:

  • 13 outstanding examples of career summaries for almost every type of IT job
  • A comprehensive skills list with over 160 technical, management, business, and life skills
  • 120 impact verbs you can use to start your bullet points
  • Resume grammar rules and formatting guidelines
  • A proofreading checklist so you don’t get torpedoed by common mistakes

How to Write an Amazing IT Resume also contains a dedicated chapter for each core type of IT job. In each of these chapters, we explain exactly what you need to do to sell yourself for that type of job.

Perfect for:

  • IT business analysts
  • Technical analysts
  • Developers / Programmers
  • Web designers
  • IT consultants
  • Helpdesk technicians
  • Systems administrators
  • Network architects
  • Software engineers
  • IT managers and directors

When it comes to resume writing, there is a mountain of misinformation out there. Many other books (and blogs) contain out-of-date, irrelevant, or just plain poor advice. You can try your luck elsewhere. OR you can read this book, which walks through the whole process from A to Z and is endorsed by numerous IT hiring managers and recruiters.

Why not take the next step in your information technology career right now? A resume might be the most important thing you ever write. Order this book today.

tags: how to write a resume, CV writing, resume writing, IT interviewing, job hunting, software development, IT consulting, job search, find a job, career guide, IT management