Category Archives: Job Interview

Smile, You’re On Video-Conference! Overcoming Obstacles When Job Interviewing

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By Karen Friedman

In today’s competitive job market, companies are looking for ways to save money when interviewing prospective job candidates.  For many, that means being interviewed by satellite or video conference versus a trip to the home office.  How can you shine?  What do you need to know about making a good impression from miles away?

It’s all the rage especially if your company is doing a little belt tightening and you can score some points by saving a few bucks. Instead of paying for travel expenses and spending your free time whining and dining a lot of potential job candidates, what about speeding up the time consuming process by conducting the interview during a videoconference that is inexpensive by comparison? Companies can save time until they’ve narrowed the search and job seekers can try to impress without traveling to all corners of the globe. After all, universities offer videoconference lecture series and companies frequently use the technology to hold global meetings. In fact, a study on web conferencing quoted in HR Magazine shows the market jumping nearly 300 percent between 2005 and 2011, to $2.9 billion. So clearly, the technology is certainly gaining popularity. The question is: to whose advantage?

While there are clearly benefits, from where I sit as a communications coach, there are also a host of barriers that prevent job candidates from feeling at ease and making their best impression. How can you possibly connect with someone and make them feel who you really are if you can’t shake their hand and look them directly in the eye? It’s like buying a car without taking it for a test drive. Given that first impressions are critical, if the job applicant is unfamiliar with the technology, appears nervous or looks off, then decision makers may form incorrect impressions. Then there’s the lighting issue. If the lighting isn’t good, the applicant can look pasty or washed out. Additionally, there are often delays as video and audio are compressed and transmitted between locations. So, that means people unknowingly talk over each other or try to fill the silence without realizing that those on the other end of the connection are still listening to someone’s response. On the other side of the screen, interviewers often forget that they are also visible and need to make a good impression. That means no slouching, checking e-mail; leafing through magazines and making potential employees feel as if they’re boring you.

Like any interview or presentation, the key to success is for both sides to prepare in advance. The first step would be to set up a phone call and talk about videoconferencing etiquette.

PHONE PRIMERS – Before the interview, the company should schedule a phone call with the applicant to explain video protocol. For example, tell them how the room will be set up, who will be there, where to look, how wide the video image will be or what technical issues could arise. Can they interrupt? Who will hear them? Will there be feedback or delay time? What’s the format and how much time will they have? It’s up to the company to send a message that says they want the interview to be successful for the prospect.

THINK TV – Appearing for a video interview is a bit like being on TV. You have to connect with people you can’t see so it’s important to engage your audience quickly. In most cases, you want to look directly into the camera so you seem completely attentive to the people on the other side of the screen. The trick is to appear natural and not over focus on the camera which is very hard for an untrained person to do. Instead, pretend that camera is one person. As a former television reporter, I used to speak to more than one million people every evening. By pretending the camera was my Mom or a friend, it was easier to speak from the heart and focus on the information I wanted to convey. It’s also important to gesture and use your hands so you’re animated, but movements can be magnified on the screen so aim for smaller, smoother movements.

DRESS FOR SUCCESS – What looks good in your mirror doesn’t always translate to the big screen. The number one rule is to wear what makes you feel good as long as it doesn’t distract from your message. For women, that means leaving big earrings, frilly tops and clunky jewelry at home. But putting on some lipstick, eyeliner and a little blush will prevent you from looking washed out. Both sexes should avoid small patterns like checks and tweeds which can “bleed” on screen. As for colors, warm bright colors typically look great, but if that’s not your style, think contrast such as a white shirt with a navy blazer as opposed to just a white shirt. And men, a viewer’s eye will go straight to your tie, so make it a good one! Finally, find out what the background is. If you’re up against a green screen and you wear green, oops, you’ll disappear.

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT – Set up a video camera and practice with a pal who can ask you questions and offer feedback. Play it back and check your body language, expressions and pace. Are you talking too fast? Are you speaking loud enough? Do you look friendly and approachable?

While videoconferencing should not replace face to face interviewing, as technology gets easierScience Articles, so will video interviewing. And the job of tomorrow may very well come down to the person who seems at ease on camera.

 

The 3 Biggest Mistakes Teens Make When Trying to Get a Job

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By Stu Schaefer 

As an employer, I interview a lot of folks… and a lot of teens. I hate to say it, but teens usually have no clue how to interview and get a job! They blow it!

This article will address the three mistakes most teens make so that you or your kid can learn how to get your favorite job.

  1. Resume

I would say about 8 out of 10 kids drop off a resume with misspellings. This is the FASTEST way for the resume to be thrown in the trash!

In addition, most resumes look like someone just spit a bunch of information into a template and hit print. The information is rarely organized and often unformatted. The result is a messy-looking resume with misspellings that gets thrown in the trash before there’s even a chance to interview.

Here are a few keys for a good resume:

  1. Triple check spelling!
  2. Don’t add an objective. Rather, write a couple of sentences explaining why you’re different and HOW you would help the company.
  3. List the jobs you’ve had… and how you impacted the company rather than just the job. I don’t care that you were a pizza delivery person. What did you do different that helped the company?
  4. List your education at the bottom because it’s not as important.
  5. Contain your resume to ONE piece of paper – front side ONLY. Most people don’t want to read a lot, and multiple pages just makes things difficult.
  1. Follow-up

OK, let’s say you submitted a great resume… that’s the least of your worries now. Many companies won’t call you back.

I don’t call anyone back. Why? Because I want to see if they’ll take the initiative and call me. I want to know if they’re a go-getter and willing to be persistent.

Most people never call back!

The call-back is very simple. All you have to do is ask if they received your resume. When they say yes, simply say “Great! Well I’d love to set up a time to interview.”

Maybe they’re actively looking for employees so they will set up an interview. Maybe they want resumes because they want to have some people ready to call IN CASE they need someone. In that case they might tell you they’re not hiring.

Ask to interview anyway. Tell them you understand, but you want to meet them so they know who you are in case they need someone.

If someone called me and said that… I might even hire them and replace one of my employees that wasn’t doing a good job. That kind of call shows initiative and demonstrates that you would be a great worker.

  1. Dress & Presentation

So now you have the interview… big deal. Most kids blow their chances because they dress terrible – They wear a tank-top, shorts, and flip flops to the interview.

Even though that might be standard clothing for most teens, it creates a bad first impression. As an employer, we think, “Oh no, this kid is unprofessional. They’re probably not a good fit.”

You just made a great phone impression, so you need to reinforce that with a good visual impression. Make sure you wear a collared shirt, either slacks or khakis, and some nice shoes. Women should wear the same thing or a nice dress that isn’t too short.

his will set you apart from the other kids applying, and it will leave a great impression with the employer… HELLO JOB!

In addition to dressing well… always remember to sit tall and speak well. Make eye contact and answer questions confidently.

When you slouch, chomp gum, or look around, it makes you look dumb and unqualified.

There you have it! If you can make these simple changes, you will make yourself much more valuable to the employer and be more likely to get the job you want!

Prepare your kid to nail the job interview!

Check out this free lesson and video tutorial that will explain, step-by-step how to get the job and set yourself apart from the other applicants!

https://preparemykid.com/lesson/nailing-any-job-interview/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Stu_Schaefer/2447706

Delete These Useless Words From Your Resume

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By Victoria LoCascio 

For the past 5 years as president of a company that helps clients to ignite their job searches and land their dream jobs, I have reviewed thousands of resumes. Since space is limited on your resume, every word needs to earn its way onto this document because of its importance. Unfortunately, many resumes contain overused or ineffective words that do not add value. Here is a list of the most common offenders that should be immediately removed.

Delete These Useless Words From Your Resume:

  • Successful / Accomplished (do not add adjectives to try to boost your status, instead show that you have been successful through the text written on your résumé)
  • Guru / Ninja / Rock Star (informal and not helpful for keyword purposes)
  • Seasoned (makes one sound old)
  • Honest (this is obvious and does not need to be stated)
  • Results-driven / Results-oriented (explain your specific results under each job position, instead of simply writing results-driven)
  • Driven / Motivated / Passionate / Focused / Hardworking (this is obvious and does not need to be stated)
  • Goal-oriented (give concrete examples using goal numbers to show that you achieved or exceeded your yearly/monthly/weekly goals)
  • Significantly (include concrete numbers or strong text to show the reader your significant results)
  • Go-to person (clearly explain your level of responsibility)
  • Team Player (it is understood that you know how to work with people)
  • Responsible for / Duties include (use more exciting action verbs to explain your responsibilities and duties; Google resume action verbs to find lists of appropriate verbs; and make sure that every bullet under each job description starts with a verb)
  • Familiar (does not convey that you are good at whatever follows)
  • Stay-At-Home Parent (potential employers should not know about your children as it is not relevant to your career)
  • Resume (do not write Resume at the top of your document)
  • Objective (do not write Objective at the top of your document, instead use a career summary section and label it with your current job title)
  • References (do not write References Available Upon Request at the bottom of your document)
  • First-person or Third-person Language (do not use first-person or third-person language, instead use formal resume language to look professional)

Make sure that you carefully proofread your resume to ensure that every word is powerful, specific, and needed. Once you believe everything is perfect, have at least 3 other people read through it to verify that there are no mistakes or unnecessary words.

Victoria LoCascio, president of http://AceYourInterview.com, is a Certified Professional Resume Writer, Certified Employment Interview Professional, Certified Negotiation Expert, Certified SEO Expert, and has master’s degrees in both Leadership and Communication. She specializes in writing powerful resumes, cover letters, and LinkedIn profiles, as well as coaching clients on interviewing skills.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Victoria_LoCascio/2501308

 

7 Important Questions Every Job Seeker Should Ask Themselves

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By Gordon Walter

Whether you’re just beginning the job hunt or you’ve been searching for months, it’s important to regularly monitor your activities and reevaluate your strategy. Keep your job search on track by asking yourself the following questions throughout the job-search process.

Am I qualified for this position?

Read the job description carefully before you submit an application. Do you meet the core requirements of the role? Only apply to jobs where you possess these must-haves. If your dream job requires a skill you don’t have, brainstorm ways to develop this skill in or out of the office.

Does my resume tell the right story?

Having the right skills is half the battle; having an application that demonstrates your qualifications is the other half. Consider your resume to be part of your personal marketing campaign. It should show potential employers why you are qualified for, and excited about, your target position.

Do I know someone at the company I can talk to?

Studies have shown you are ten times more likely to land a job when your application is accompanied by an employee referral. Search your network before you apply to a position. If your network is stale, it’s time to get out there and make new connections! .

Have I Googled my name this month?

A Jobvite survey found that 93 percent of recruiters are likely to look at a candidate’s social profile. Additionally, 42 percent have reconsidered a candidate based on the content of their online profiles, leading to both positive and negative re-assessments. Regularly monitor and manage your online brand to ensure it supports your goals, rather than sabotaging them.

What have I learned recently?

Whether you’re looking to climb up the corporate ladder or you’re currently unemployed and seeking work, it’s important to continually seek out relevant professional development activities. By learning new technologies, attending workshops and gaining certifications, you are becoming a more attractive candidate and opening yourself up to new networking opportunities.

Have I stepped outside my comfort zone to find new job leads?

Oftentimes job seekers will default to the one job-search method that’s most comfortable to them. However, it’s important to employ multiple methods to find the largest number of relevant job leads. Apply to opportunities online, engage in recruiter activity, and leverage your network.

Am I ready for the interview?

Don’t set foot in the interview room unless you’ve researched the organization and prepared thoughtful questions for the interviewer. Employers want to know that you’ve done your homework and are taking the interview seriously.

 

What Should You Include in a Resignation Letter?

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By ELIZABETH GARONE

I am often asked, “What should I include in my resignation letter?”  The more important question to be asking is what not to include, say the experts. “Less is always more,” says Roy Cohen, a Manhattan-based career counselor and executive coach. “This is not the time to set the record straight. Know that it’s a small world.” By leaving on the best note possible, you also keep open the option for a return to the company should your circumstances change.

By leaving on the best note possible, you keep open the option for a return to the company should your circumstances change.

Rather than airing your grievances with the company, you should set a positive tone from the start, says Marilyn Puder-York, a psychologist and executive coach in the New York metro area. One way to do this is to include a sentence or two at the top that shows your appreciation for the opportunity to work at the company and the experience it has given you.

Small courtesies are also important. This includes giving enough notice: a minimum of two weeks but preferably one month, says Ms. Puder-York, who has seen people give as much as six months, a move that she wouldn’t recommend. “You lose a lot of power and credibility in six months,” she says. Your preferred last day should also be included in the letter.

Both Mr. Cohen and Ms. Puder-York recommend that you don’t list reasons for your resignation, no matter how tempting it might seem. “Once you’ve made the decision to leave, the reasons are superfluous,” says Mr. Cohen. One option is to include the following sentence at the end of your letter: “I would be happy to discuss my reasons for resigning as well as any particular support I can give you during the transition,” suggests Ms. Puder-York.

“Make the letter clear, direct and simple,” she says. “You should always wait to give additional information in a verbal discussion. The letter ends up in your file. You don’t know where it is going to go.”

At some companies, a formal resignation letter may not even be necessary, says Ms. Puder-York. But she still recommends submitting one, equating it with the increasingly rare written thank-you note. “It is the smart, respectful thing to do, and it’s a gracious thing to do if you do it well,” she says.

Find Your Fit: A Practical Guide to Landing a Job You’ll Love

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By Sue Kaiden

You want no, you need a new job. But not just any job. The job. So you polish your resume till it shines. You apply for countless openings, tailoring your message to each. You search for the hidden job market, although it remains very well hidden. And the response? Well, it’s underwhelming. To top things off, maze-like online application systems appear designed to keep you and the perfect job apart. What’s going on?

How people successfully land jobs has changed. You need help from a pro, someone who navigates career data, the labor market, and hot jobs with ease. You want a coach who will tell you what to pursue and what to avoid, and an expert who has mastered job-hunting and career change to offer wisdom gained from experience. What you need is a career coach. Better yet, several.

Expert career coaches contributing to this volume include Lakeisha Mathews, Dan Schwartz, Sheila Margolis, Alisa Cohn, Michelle Riklan, Marie Zimenoff, Laura Labovich, Lynne Williams, Thea Kelley, Jean Juchnowicz, Alan DeBack, Marilyn Feldstein, Vivian Blade, David Hosmer, Barbara Seifert, and Nicole Miller.

Find Your Fit guides you through answering foundational questions like: What do I want to do with my career? Where should I do it? And how do I get there? As you develop a strong sense of self-awareness, you’ll be able to identify the work environment best for you, shape your online identity, and network more effectively by focusing on people instead of openings. You’ll learn about coveted employee referrals, and how to get one at your target company. With the help of experienced career coaches, you’ll be able to handle any kind of interview. And, you’ll become familiar with the pre-employment testing and assessments increasingly common today.

What are you waiting for? Your personal coaching session awaits

Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters, Unlock Linkedin

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By Dr. Karen Gurney

If you are a busy professional that is seeking to get calls for jobs without applying by tapping recruiters — then you want this book.  Now Book Comes with Bonus Online Class & Templates!
My Story and Why This Book is for You
I have been working in the recruiting industry as an Executive Search Consultant and Career Coach since 2004, but something happened in 2015 that completely changed how I worked, literally overnight.
A Digital Marketing Manager came to me as a client after failing to get a job. He had searched for a year and could barely get a call for a job interview. Before I started his job search campaign, I checked his LinkedIn.com profile to make sure it looked good.
His LinkedIn profile was absolutely horrifying.
The picture was a selfie that looked like a mugshot following a police interrogation. His profile had too much information that was irrelevant to his goals, his headline was meaningless, and he only had 24 connections. There was no way I could position someone that was supposed to be an expert in digital marketing with this repellent LinkedIn profile.
My client was absolutely desperate for job.
He was a nice guy and a good job candidate with a lot of related experience. I used to just give online profile tips but I knew time was of the essence and I needed to take control of his online image immediately.
I got his logins for LinkedIn and other online job boards to re-align everything.
Within 48 hours he had over 300 Linkedin connections and one job interview. By the end of the week, he had four job interviews and had hit the 500+ connection mark and …
He had not applied for a single job! Not one!
All the job interviews he got were from his online profiles. This method is now the core of my career coaching practice.
So what is the secret? It is just one phrase: Keyword-stacking.
Once you learn how to keyword-stack your profiles, you will get calls too.

What You Will Be Able to Do After This Book

• Have recruiters come straight to you for great jobs
• Get calls for jobs without applying
• Tap unadvertised jobs in the hidden job market

BONUS: You Also Get FREE access to my $200 Award-winning Class which includes

• My copyrighted ‘Core-3©’ career assessment
• Fill-in-the-blank interview preparation scripts
• Salary negotiation scripts and so much more!

Reviews from my 5-Star Online Course

“I bought this on Kindle for $3.99, and it’s probably the best investment I’ve made in my job search.” Garden Goddess
“Concise, efficient, effective. With amazingly helpful downloadable content (just copy and paste into document)…Generates results, works for every industry and all job levels.” by Kevin Massabni,
“Best-practices how-to book, and integrated video..” Paula Dee

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Karen Gurney was born, raised, and lives in Cleveland Ohio with her husband, two Goldendoodles, and a Papillon. As a Clevelander, she grew up living with the decline and rebirth of a city that displaced countless professionals and families. This fostered her interest in urban economics, workforce development, and job markets resulting in her unique market-based strategies.
Karen has 20 years of combined experience in executive search consulting, career coaching, and human resources. As the Director of Strategic Development of Career IQ, she leverages a Doctorate in Economic and Workforce Development and a Masters in Business Administration. Dr. Gurney’s work has been featured on major U.S. news networks and she currently has eight online classes that teach career and business strategies in over 100 countries assisting over 8,000 students in their career pursuits.

Don’t Put These 5 Things in Your Resume

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Executive resumes deserve just as much attention as a resume for any other job. You may be surprised to know most resumes for executive positions are generally poorly done. However, that just gives you the opportunity to shine brightly when it comes to your resume! Your executive bio needs to stand out from the rest. Most importantly, it needs to be error-free and you need to avoid putting some things in it altogether. We’ve compiled a list of five common, but unnecessary, things people put in their executive resumes.

Too Wordy
As an executive, you likely have many accomplishments and all of them are important to you. However, if you put too much on your resume, recruiters may stop reading it and move on to the next one. The best executive resume writers will include two or three key points to highlight skills and then move on. Think concise. Ask yourself, “Does this need to be on here?” You don’t want to overwhelm recruiters on paper.

Omitting Keywords
In today’s digital world, most resumes are scanned online for specific keywords pertaining to the job. Sometimes the keywords are more important than the substance in the resume. Look at the job description and use a lot of the words they use to describe the job. If you need help identifying specific keywords, you can always reach out to an executive resume service for assistance.

Focusing Too Much on Job Descriptions
Talk briefly about your job duties at your past jobs, but focus more on what you accomplished in those roles. Everyone can describe what they did at a particular job, but highlighting how well you did your job looks much better on paper.

Not Highlighting Achievements
This is where you need to use numbers and percentages to show how you made an impact in your previous jobs. Your executive bio will be much stronger if you say you “increased sales by 40 percent over 12 months” rather than just saying you “helped boost sales.” Be specific about your achievements so your next employer knows what you have to offer before you even step foot in their office.

Not Targeting Your Prospective Employer
Having a generic resume may be fine if you’re applying for a lower level position, but you need to do a little more work upfront for an executive level position. Do some research about the job and company you’re applying to. Identify how you can help them and include those points in your resume. The best executive resume writers will focus more on how they can help potential hirers, rather than what they’ve done in the past.

Erin Kennedy, MCD, CERW, CMRW, CEMC, CPRW, BS/HR, is a Certified Executive Resume Writer & Career Consultant, and the Managing Director of Professional Resume Services, Inc. She is a nationally published writer and contributor of 16 best-selling career books.

She has achieved international recognition following yearly nominations of the prestigious T.O.R.I. (Toast of the Resume Industry) Award. She is also one of only a few professionals worldwide to achieve the coveted “Certified Master Resume Writer” distinction. With over 17 years of writing experience behind her, Erin has written thousands of resumes for every career level and every industry.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Erin_Kennedy/161383

Does Your Cover Letter Let You Down

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Getting that competitive advantage in a crowded job market can be a challenge. One of the best tools you have outside of your Resume is a compelling Cover Letter that has fresh, engaging content that clearly outlines why you are the best fit for the role.

This is the perfect opportunity to present to the Recruiter or Hiring Manager a number of compelling reasons why you should move to the next stage of the process, an interview.

Ensure you have read and understood the role requirements and what is needed to succeed and put forward why you, meet and exceed those key requirements.

Nothing captures the attention of a Recruiter or Hiring Manager more than a well-tailored document highlighting why you, as a potential employee meet those requirements. Also, provide some specific examples in the document.

While this may take some time to complete, the investment can be worth it, regardless if you undertake the document yourself, or get a professional service provider to undertake the work for you.

Don’t leave a Recruiter or Hiring Manager to read between the lines in your Resume, put forward why you meet the requirements and what you will bring to the role – be clear on the value you will add to the business.

A couple of key things to consider:

Spelling and Grammar: check your spelling and grammar (get a trusted friend to review your document or use a resume service provider such as Resumes to you).

Content: ensure your content is fresh, exciting and not a simple copy and past of your resume content.

Format: format your document in a standard professional layout. Your cover letter is a first impression and you want to make the right impact. If it’s badly formatted, it could negatively impact your chances.

Personalise your cover letter: If you know the recruiters name, address the letter to them. Add the name and address of the company and add the position name as the reference. (personalising your cover letter will have a positive impact).

Double check: Before you hit send, make sure you have attached the correct documents, especially when sending. Sending an application for a job addressed to the wrong company or recruiter could kill your chances. It looks unprofessional, sloppy, and demonstrates lack of care or attention to detail.

Fixing an issue: If you send an application and suddenly realise that you have sent an incorrect document, don’t forget about it… contact the recruiter and inform them that you have sent the wrong document and arrange to send the correct items – you’ll be surprised how this can work for you.

There are other things to consider, based on your needs when developing a cover letter.

One of the best investments you can make is to have your cover letter reviewed and, if needed, professionally rewritten to improve your chances in a competitive and crowded market.

If you have errors or your document is poorly written, that could cost you dearly during your application process, so checking these few items could make all the difference.

Resumes for you:
https://www.resumesforyou.com.au

Resumes for you: Tip of the week
https://www.resumesforyou.com.au/tip-week-cover-letter/

Winning the Interview

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Some people think that preparing for a job interview is fairly simple. Once you get the call to come in for one you essentially have the job unless you blow the interview. This is not to disrespect Walmart or McDonald’s but unless you are applying for a company like that, the interview process is not easy at all. In fact, getting the interview more times than not is easier than the actual interview itself. This pillar post is going to be for my viewers that are looking for a full-time job and hopefully it’s a highly looked at company.

The first step is having a great resume. There are plenty of good examples on the internet for samples but those are also mixed in with bad ones. Some keys things that you want in your resume are; having as many numbers as possible. It’s much more eye opening for an employer to see you raised over $10,000 in revenue during your 8 week internship than saying you raised a lot of money. Another thing is to make sure the formatting is done correctly. Make sure that everything lines up nicely and that you stay consistent on your word usage such as tenses. Also make sure to use a different starting word for the description of your prior positions. Then there are the more basic things such as make sure there are no spelling or grammar mistakes because that can instantly lose you an interview chance. LinkedIn is similar to your resume but where your resume should only include your most important and relevant things since it should only be a single full page, your LinkedIn page should include everything you’ve done. It should be a page that an employer can visit and see where you went to school, what you did there, how you did there, strengths, weaknesses, and any jobs you had up to this point.

Now if a company has asked you to come in for an interview, this is where you start researching that company. Everyone has many strengths and weaknesses, but this is where you need to see the companies values and what not and tie your best strengths to those values. It’s also where if you have a weakness of time management and their biggest thing is to have great time management, that’s a weakness you shouldn’t bring up. This next part isn’t always possible but now a days companies will let you know who you are interviewing with or it is the HR recruiter who told you that you have an interview. This is where you should look up the interviewer on LinkedIn, connect with them and learn some things about them. That way you can ask them questions more directed at them at the end of the interview. You should also ask your recruiter what specific position you are interviewing for so that you can plan accordingly for that one. Now it’s time for the dress code during an interview. Almost every job will want you to come in dressed business professional.

Even if they don’t say it, a common saying in business is that it is better to be overdressed than under dressed. For those who don’t know, business professional is a suit collared button down shirt with a suit jacket that matches the dress pants and a tie. I understand you might not already have a suit or that you don’t have the money to buy one. Some companies might understand and in that case you can just come in business casual which is business professional but without the suit jacket. If the company insists you be business professional which is understandable as you might need a suit during your job, such as if you’re visiting a client or on a company dinner. Then a possible substitute is to get one from Goodwill as they usually have an okay selection of them and can actually still be in pretty good condition. This is of course like a flat tire where it should only last you until you have the money to replace it with a real suit.

Now before the interview you should know exactly where the interview is happening at and any more specifics like if it’s in a specific room. If you are supposed to arrive at 10:00AM, leave so that you get there anytime from 8:00AM – 9:00AM. This will leave you plenty of time in case you get stuck in traffic, lost, or need to stop for something. The great part about getting there early is that you can continue to practice for the interview. One way of practicing is by looking up common asked interview questions so that you can be more confident going into the interview.

Now during the interview you’re going to want to shake every persons hand in the room whether there are two people or twenty. With the handshake make sure to have a firm grasp and go directly in, not from an upper angle or lower angle. Seems petty but some people think if you are coming in for the handshake from an upper angle, it’s you trying to show dominance. When shaking hands make sure to look the person in the eyes and introduce yourself. Then when you begin your interview make sure to calm yourself down. This will help you not to ramble on answers and or forget answers. If the interviewer asks a tough question, you don’t have to respond right away. Ask them if you can take a second to think about the answer. Most interviewers will like that you are willing to think first instead of going right into the answer. After the interview, the interviewer will ask if you have any questions. NEVER SAY NO! That can ruin your entire interview because most interviewers are waiting for questions and asking none can leave them with a bad taste in their mouth. Make sure to have 2-3 pre-planned questions and then try to think of 2-3 questions during the interview. That way you can easily ask three or four questions. After you’re done with questions make sure to shake everyone’s hand again and thank them for their time. If you do all of these things correctly, there shouldn’t be a single employer who won’t hire you.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Daniel_J_McCurdy/2438403