Category Archives: Job Search Resources

Secrets to Finding an Executive Position While Still Employed

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By Erin Kennedy 

Following are highlights from Erin’s article:  “The Secrets to Finding an Executive Position While Still Employed”

Think Outside the “Networking” Box

  • There are many ways to network.
  • The hidden job market is the best way to go about conducting a secret job search.
    • Attending professional events or using the tools offered by LinkedIn, are excellent ways to learn about jobs not yet advertised.
  • Even volunteering or being involved in your community can lead to new opportunities, so being active can move your job search forward as well.

Be Careful When Using LinkedIn

  • Use LinkedIn when searching for a new job.
    • Begin by updating settings.
      • If settings are not updated appropriately, connections may be able to see every change to profile.
    • Remember that co-workers and bosses are often included as members of the Connections network.
    • When working on LinkedIn profile development, alter settings to ensure the wrong people don’t see any changes made.

Strictly Confidential

  • It’s important to keep things under wraps, until ready to go public. Keep things confidential.
    • Use the term “confidential applicant” instead of name, to avoid showing up on the current employer’s search for a new candidate.
    • Not using the company’s name anywhere on the resume is important.

Don’t Use Company Time

  • Job searches should not be done on company time.
    • If your current boss finds out, there’s a chance you could be fired.
    • If a potential employer finds out search was conducted on company time, they may think you’ll do the same to them and not offer you a job.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Erin_Kennedy/161383

Job Search Tips – What Phrases Should You Use on Job Search Sites?

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By Adnan Masood   

If you are looking for a job, you are likely to search online. The good news? There are many job search sites for you to choose from. Aside from the larger and well-known sites, there are also those that are locally run and operated. Regardless of which website you use, how you search is very important. After all, the fastest way to seek employment is to find jobs that you are qualified for.

In terms of searching for job search sites, how can you do this?

Here are three different ways that you can find open positions that you are qualified for online:

Job Search Tip #1 – Search with the Job Title Name.  This is a pretty simple approach, yet it is the best. What position are you looking to find? Is it a retail manager? If so, ideal search phrases include retail management, retail manager, or store manager. Is it a work at home sales position? If so, ideal search phrases include home-based sales, inbound sales rep, work at home sales, and so forth.

Job search sites pull keywords from your search and pair it with keywords inside a job listing. Since a company always labels a job with the title, this method of searching produces the best results.

Job Search Tip #2 – Search with Job Duty.  Another way to find a job on a job search site is to do a search with a duty. For example, a retail worker often must perform sales work, customer service, and checking out customers. Ideal search phrases include customer service, cashier, sales, and so forth.

As previously stated, job search sites pull keywords from your search phrase and attempt to match up those phrases with keywords inside a job listing posted online. While the best results are produced by using a job title, you can search with a job duty instead as well. The only downside is that some duties are similar for a wide range of jobs; therefore, you are likely to get more non-relevant results with this approach.

Job Search Tip #3 – Search with Company Name.  Do you want to work for a specific company? If so, you can also do a search with that company name. If you are looking for a better paying job, this approach is ideal. However, if you are looking for any decent position that will provide a paycheck now, it is best to use one of the above-mentioned options that produce more results.

While this method of searching job sites does work, results are not guaranteed. Why? While a good percentage of companies do include their company name, some like to keep this information hidden. While it won’t hurt to use this method of searching when seeking employment, know that you do have other options. You should use those other options if your search does not produce any results.

So there you have it; you now got a few great suggestions on the different methods of searching when it comes to looking for employment on job search sites.

Take 10 Years Off Your Image

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By Stephen Viscusi, The Ladders

Suggestions on how to take 10 years off your image and be perceived as more youthful in the office.

How old an impression do you make when you’re interviewing? Of course, we all know that an interviewer can just count backward from the year of graduation printed on your resume. However, here is the truth: Perception is a new reality like 60 is the new 50. So you need to learn the fine art of being perceived as younger as well as looking younger. It’s more than just the way you look.

Is this fair? Is it even legal? And most importantly, should you give in to such nonsense? I’ll put it this way: If you are over 40, you need to read on.

Though the economy is much stronger, so is the penchant for mergers, acquisitions, and other organizational changes.  So now some bosses can use such events as a reason to thin the ranks.  And pay attention, over-40s:  A reduction in force is an especially perfect opportunity for higher-ups to fire those senior workers whose high wages and big egos have outlasted their welcome.

For those who are already unemployed, you must do whatever it takes to convey to hiring managers that you are employable. What does this mean? No one wants to hire someone who’s stuck in the old-fashioned way of thinking that being qualified, working hard and being loyal to a company is enough. Your Princeton degree and enviable references won’t get you far if you’re that naïve.

So back to the age thing.

While many workers have learned that good looks and a polished appearance go a long way toward success in the workplace, too many of them fail to realize that cultivating the perception of youth and a hip attitude is an equally important part of the equation. It’s no secret that we live in an age-obsessed society. Like it or not, “interviewing younger” is the new catchphrase.

“Interviewing younger” and being perceived as more youthful at the office is a vocabulary, a body language, and a look. And here’s a secret: These rules apply even more when your boss is your age or even older. It’s not like you are following these rules to impress a young person. Whatever the age of your boss or interviewer, you need to create a youthful perception about yourself. Otherwise, there’s someone else waiting in the wings with quicker computer skills and contemporary pop-culture knowledge who will be all too happy to fill your shoes.

So how do you do it? Here are some of the secrets in my new book, “Bulletproof Your Job” (HarperCollins), use them to remind yourself how to hold onto your job while those around you are losing theirs):

Crest Whitestrips.
Yup, this is a shallow, cosmetic-based tip. But I get so many letters from people who just don’t understand that having coffee-stained teeth doesn’t do you any favors in the interview department. Stop rolling your eyes; go buy the strips (use the store brand for all I care – I’m not picky), and whiten those teeth. Then smile. Smiling makes you look and feel younger – not bitter, old and unemployed. I don’t care if you really are bitter, old and unemployed. It’s about perception, remember?

If you are over 40, I want you on LinkedIn today.
If you don’t know how to join, just ask someone.  Let that same person help you choose your profile picture. Seriously.

Know about and frequently use Google and Wikipedia.
Bookmark them on your computer, and set one as your homepage.

Peruse your local Apple store.
At least learn the difference between an iPad, MacBook Pro, or Android and iOS, and you’re on your way.  And buy a set of those headphones to keep around. It’s all about perception.

Do not disclose your SAT scores.
If for some ungodly reason you still remember your SAT scores, keep them to yourself. Not only does no one care, but the scoring isn’t even the same anymore, and you’ll just wind up aging yourself.

Don’t talk about how you’re so addicted to Starbucks.
Or Coffee Bean, or whatever your coffee place of choice is. It seems like this would make you appear younger, but it won’t. Starbucks screams “unemployed loser.” Besides, you should never walk into an interview with a coffee cup, especially since you just whitened those teeth.

Pick up a copy of “Entertainment Weekly” before an interview.
But for God’s sake, don’t take it in with you and don’t let anyone see you reading it. That said, nothing gets you more up to date on the youthful world of pop culture like an issue of EW.

Learn how to text.
Many younger people do not use email.

Lose the paper.
Young people get their news online – they don’t read newspapers as much. So don’t carry one into an interview with you or be seen reading it at the office like someone’s mom or dad.

Brush up on sports.
This is easy; you can still get away with talking about Michael Phelps and get credit for this one. Bonus points for knowing who’s in the NCAA tournament.

Make eye contact.
Eye contact is so critical to being perceived as young; don’t be afraid to use it.

Rarely refer to your children.
Never refer to your grandchildren and never ever your great-grandchildren.

Go to the gym.
Or at least get moving.  Regular and brisk walks can work wonders.

Never talk about the ’80s or ’90s.
Never use words from “your day.” Nothing at work is groovy, dy-no-mite, or tubular. Ever.

Get a DVR.
Know how they work.

Practice “sounding young” on the phone.
Take a small survey of how old you sound on the phone, and then practice with a friend sounding younger. (A tip: Talk higher and peppier.) This is critical. In the same vein, make sure your outgoing voicemail message isn’t too long or boring. Short and sweet with a positive attitude is all you need.

Dress is very important: always dress age-appropriate.
It never works to try dressing like a millennial.

Give your hairstyle a long, hard look.
No wonder there are so many makeover shows! My advice is to ask an outsider his or her opinion. Someone who loves you won’t want to hurt your feelings or may love your look for sentimental or romantic reasons – but sadly, that won’t help you find a job. A bad coloring job spells disaster for both men and women, and let’s faces it, hair weaves for men rarely work. Men, don’t go overboard on finding a new hairstyle – just clip your nose and ear hair and you’re on the right track. Ladies, pluck or bleach facial hair.

Skip the cologne and excessive perfume.
And while we’re on the subject, wear deodorant. You may laugh, but many people just don’t do it.

Okay… Feel any younger, or just berated?

Trust me, I just took 15 years off the way you come across. Yeah, some things I talk about here are cosmetic, but most are not. It’s all about perception … and perception is a new reality.

The 21st Century Job Search

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By Bruce Hurwitz

Bruce Hurwitz has never been afraid of controversy, nor is he hesitant to admit when he is wrong. Accordingly, in The 21st Century Job Search, he revisits his previous comments on such things as wearing large engagement rings to job interviews, his short-lived position as a career coach at a New York university, and coping with discrimination, topics which raised some eyebrows when he originally wrote about them on LinkedIn.

In the book you will learn:

  • How to prepare for an effective job search;
  • How to research prospective employers;
  • How to handle your Internet presence;
  • How to utilize LinkedIn to build your brand and attract employers;
  • How to effectively network – especially if you are shy;
  • How to prepare for surprises;
  • How to correctly read job descriptions to avoid frustration;
  • What really happens to, and how to write, effective cover letters;
  • What really happens to, and how to write, effective resumes;
  • How to properly prepare for phone, video and in-person interviews;
  • What questions to ask, and how to answers questions you will be asked, in interviews;
  • How to follow-up after an interview;
  • About legal and illegal discrimination; and
  • About negotiating, offer letters and resigning.

Hurwitz also tackles the “tough” issues of dealing with a “resume gap,” raising health issues, and how to turn having been a stay-at-home parent or caregiver into an attraction for employers.

But he does not simply tell readers what to do, when possible, he shows them. There is a script, especially for the shy, for effective networking and follow up. Additionally, readers will find sample letters for networking, expressing interest in a company, applying for jobs, thanking interviewers and, his personal favorite, the rejection letter.

While in the book he gives particular advice to veterans, college students, “older” candidates, the long-term unemployed, stay-at-home parents, and caregivers about how to minimize rejection and reduce frustration, and effectively cope with the different stages of a job search, the book is for any job seeker regardless of their circumstances.

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For expert resume help, contact:

Land Your Dream Job Anywhere

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By Mac Prichard

Job hunting is not an innate ability; no one is born with the magical power to land a great job. It is a learned skill that anyone can master with practice. Unfortunately, most people are never taught how to look for a job. High school and college teach us the technical skills to use in our career, but we are never taught the nuts-and-bolts of how to conduct a strategic job search. Instead, we are left mostly to rely on trial and error. That’s the reason this book exists—to outline a proven job-search strategy that actually works. You’ll find a process that results in a faster, less-frustrating job search—one that maximizes your chances of finding a job you love

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For expert resume help, contact: 

A Time-Tested Model For Job Search Success

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By Gordon Walter

Simple and straightforward, the following basic job search model works over and over again.  This is not to minimize the fact that effectively looking for a job is hard work.  But the steps to getting there can be boiled-down to the following:

·         Be motivated.  Ensure attitude is positive and upbeat (even if you do not feel that way).

·         Seek assistance.  Be proactive and do not hesitate to ask for help from family, friends or a job search professional.

·         Select appropriate job search approach.  There are many good ones out there, and many work just fine.  The secret is to pick one and get started.

·         Assess skills and identify core competencies.  The Internet or your local library are replete with many fine resources that are available to help with this.   Other good sources can be found at the Career Center website of a university or your local community college.

·         Develop job search plan.  Establish a budgeted amount of time for job search activity, set some goals and when they will be accomplished.

·         Conduct research on jobs, employers, and communities.  Thanks to the Internet, there is a huge amount of information available concerning employers.  GlassDoor.com is a helpful resource on a number of topics, including employer pay, benefits and employment practices.

·         Prepare due diligence to ensure effectively written applications, resumes and letters.  Spend the time NOW to prepare resume, cover letter templates and other correspondence.  Insure they are PERFECT, and ready to send if potential employer suddenly says “send me a resume.”

·         Network for information, advice and referrals.  It is an undeniable fact that most people who get jobs get them as a result of networking.  It can be hard work, but resist the temptation to sit at a computer cranking out resumes to job boards, and spend the MAJORITY of your time in networking activity.

·         Develop winning job interview skills.  Consult with job search websites or contact a skilled professional.  Some employers have honed the selection process to a high art, and you need to be ready updated on what to say, not say, and contemporary thinking on the best interviewing protocols.  The higher a job is on the organization chart, the more complex a hiring process can be.

Motivated * Assistance * Approach * Core Competencies * Research * Due Diligence * Network * Interview Skills

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10 Words and Terms That Ruin a Resume

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By Charles Purdy, Monster.com Senior Editor*

Your resume needs an update — that is, if your resume is like that of most people, it’s not as good as it could be.  The problem is language:  Most resumes are a thicket of deadwood words and phrases — empty cliches, annoying jargon and recycled buzzwords.  Recruiters, HR folks and hiring managers see these terms over and over again, and it makes them sad.

Wouldn’t you rather make them happy?  It’s time to start raking out your resume, starting with these (and similar) terms.

1. “Salary negotiable.”  Yes, they know.  If you’re wasting a precious line of your resume on this term, it looks as though you’re padding — that you’ve run out of things to talk about.  If your salary is not negotiable, that would be somewhat unusual.  (Still, don’t put that on your resume either.)

2. “References available by request.”  See the preceding comment about unnecessary terms.

3. “Responsible for ______.”  Reading this term, the recruiter can almost picture the C-average, uninspired employee mechanically fulfilling his job requirements — no more, no less.  Having been responsible for something isn’t something you did — it’s something that happened to you.  Turn phrases like “responsible for” into “managed,” “led” or other decisive, strong verbs.

4. “Experience working in ______.”  Again, experience is something that happens to you — not something you achieve.  Describe your background in terms of achievements.

5. “Problem-solving skills.”  You know who else has problem-solving skills? Monkeys.  Dogs.  On your resume, stick to skills that require a human.

6. “Detail-oriented.”  So, you pay attention to details.  Well, so does everyone else.  Don’t you have something unique to tell the hiring manager?  Plus, putting this on your resume will make that accidental typo in your cover letter or resume all the more comical.

7. “Hardworking.”  Have you ever heard the term “show — don’t tell?”  This is where that might apply.  Anyone can call himself a hard worker.  It’s a lot more convincing if you describe situations in concrete detail in which your hard work benefited an employer.

8. “Team player.”  See the preceding comment about showing instead of telling.  There are very few jobs that don’t involve working with someone else.  If you have relevant success stories about collaboration, put them on your resume.  Talk about the kinds of teams you worked on, and how you succeeded.

9. “Proactive.”  This is a completely deflated buzzword. Again, show rather than tell.

10. “Objective.”  This term isn’t always verboten, but you should use it carefully.  If your objective is to get the job you’ve applied for, there’s no need to spell that out on your resume with its own heading.  A resume objective is usually better replaced by a career summary describing your background, achievements and what you have to offer an employer.  An exception might be if you haven’t applied for a specific job and don’t have a lot of experience that speaks to the position you’d like to achieve.

* Used with permission

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Cracking the Coding Interview

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Cracking the Coding Interview, 6th Edition is here to help you through this process, teaching you what you need to know and enabling you to perform at your very best. I’ve coached and interviewed hundreds of software engineers. The result is this book.

Learn how to uncover the hints and hidden details in a question, discover how to break down a problem into manageable chunks, develop techniques to unstick yourself when stuck, learn (or re-learn) core computer science concepts, and practice on 189 interview questions and solutions.

These interview questions are real; they are not pulled out of computer science textbooks. They reflect what’s truly being asked at the top companies, so that you can be as prepared as possible. WHAT’S INSIDE?

  • 189 programming interview questions, ranging from the basics to the trickiest algorithm problems.
  • A walk-through of how to derive each solution, so that you can learn how to get there yourself.
  • Hints on how to solve each of the 189 questions, just like what you would get in a real interview.
  • Five proven strategies to tackle algorithm questions, so that you can solve questions you haven’t seen.
  • Extensive coverage of essential topics, such as big O time, data structures, and core algorithms.
  • A behind the scenes look at how top companies like Google and Facebook hire developers.
  • Techniques to prepare for and ace the soft side of the interview: behavioral questions.
  • For interviewers and companies: details on what makes a good interview question and hiring process

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Interviewing Basics

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By Duncan Gotobed

Let’s face it successful interviewing is much more than just giving the right answers to questions. As with most things, preparation is the key to success. Without proper preparation, you will go into an interview as if you were driving a car blindfolded and on the wrong side of the road.

Plan your travel route.  The last thing you want to do is get lost or be late for an interview, so plan your travel route ahead of time. Find out where the interview will take place and decide how you will get there (car, bus, taxi, etc.), then conduct a “trial run” using that mode of transportation. Factor in any other possible complications such as road construction or rush hour traffic do determine how long it will take you to get to the interview.

Once you know how long it takes to get there and you have factored in other issues such as traffic, add at least 15 minutes to the amount of time you think it will take. This extra bit of “insurance” means you will be better able to deal with unforeseen events and last minute issues.

Get to know the organization.  Potential employers want to know that you are interested enough in their organization to learn a bit about it before an interview. Conducting research to learn about an organization also demonstrates that you are proactive, forward thinking, and willing to put in extra effort to be better prepared.

The internet is an excellent tool for researching an organization, as are marketing brochures and annual reports from the organization. Ask around to your friends and professional contacts to find out if anyone has any experience with or knowledge of the company. Some experts also recommend that you check the electronic archives of the local newspaper to see what, if anything has been written about the company over the previous twelve months or so.

Plan your approach.  Once you get to the interview you will have to “sell” yourself. The interviewer will be evaluating you on the answers you give to questions, of course, but also on many other things that you might not think about, so plan for these in advance.

Dress the part.  The way you are dressed and how you enter the interview room have a huge effect on the first impression you make. Select an outfit that is appropriate for the culture of the organization (conservative, modern, casual, etc.) and practice walking into the interview room with confidence and a smile.

Plan and practice your answers to likely questions, especially those behavioral-based questions that are so popular right now. Here are a couple of example questions:

  • Describe a situation in which you had to deal with an angry customer.
  • Describe a situation in which you made a mistake

The key to successfully answering these questions is to cover three key things – the situation, the action you took, and the result you achieved.  Keep your stories short and factual, and even practice them in advance so that you become fluent when talking about them.

Make no mistake about it, the better prepared you are the more comfortable you will feel in your interview

ABOUT THE AUTHOR.  Duncan Gotobed makes it easy for you to get your next job and hit the ground running. Learn more great ways to enhance your employability. Visit Top Briefings.com today to access a range of e-briefings that can help you become more successful.

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Behavioral Interviewing Questions

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By R.J. Sullivan  

Behavioral interviewing uses behaviors presented in the past to predict future behavior.  It is the best interviewing method to avoid gut feelings, stereotypes and biases.  

The focus on behaviors will allow you to choose the best candidate for the job.

Behavioral interviewing is the most effective way to hire a qualified employee. It takes gut feelings, stereotypes and biases out of the process and allows you to look at candidates in more scientific terms. The process is called behavioral because it uses behaviors presented in the past to predict future behaviors. The process sounds easy but it takes practice and persistence. You need to know the exact behaviors that are critical for the job you are interviewing for and then you need to prepare questions that will illicit the responses you need to analyze the candidates behaviors. When you ask behavioral interviewing questions it is imperative that you probe and allow the candidate time and silence to answer the questions.

  1. Give me an example of a time you where you had a particularly difficult customer and how you handled the situation.
  2. Describe for me a situation where you didn’t agree with a company policy and learned to work within the confines of that policy.
  3. Give me an example of a time when you were given instructions by your manager that you didn’t agree with and how you handled the situation.
  4. Tell me about a time when you had conflict with a co-worker and how you were able to resolve that conflict.
  5. Give me an example of a time when you provided extraordinary service and please be specific with the steps you took to achieve this result.
  6. Describe for me a time when you didn’t understand how to complete a task and what you did to finish the work.
  7. Tell me about a time that you had to use creativity to solve a problem at work.
  8. Tell me about a time when you were not feeling well or in a bad mood and had to motivate yourself at work.
  9. Describe for me a time that you had a co-worker with a bad attitude and how you handled that situation.
  10. Give me an example of a time you made a mistake when working with a customer and how you handled the situation.

Remember to research the behaviors needed for the position you are interviewing for and prepare your questions carefully. Also, use silence and probe further so you can get the information needed to make an informed hiring decision. Behavioral interviewing will take the gut feelings, stereotypes and biases that we all have out of the equation and you will make better hiring decisions.

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