Category Archives: Career Coaching

The Future of Work: Attract New Talent, Build Better Leaders, and Create a Competitive Organization

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By Jacob Morgan

Throughout the history of business employees had to adapt to managers and managers had to adapt to organizations. In the future this is reversed with managers and organizations adapting to employees.  This means that in order to succeed and thrive organizations must rethink and challenge everything they know about work.

The demographics of employees are changing and so are employee expectations, values, attitudes, and styles of working.  Conventional management models must be replaced with leadership approaches adapted to the future employee. Organizations must also rethink their traditional structure, how they empower employees, and what they need to do to remain competitive in a rapidly changing world.

This is a book about how employees of the future will work, how managers will lead, and what organizations of the future will look like.
The Future of Work will help you:

  • Stay ahead of the competition
  • Create better leaders
  • Tap into the freelancer economy
  • Attract and retain top talent
  • Rethink management
  • Structure effective teams
  • Embrace flexible work environments
  • Adapt to the changing workforce
  • Build the organization of the future
  • And more

The book features uncommon examples and easy to understand concepts which will challenge and inspire you to work differently.

The Employee Experience Advantage

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The Employee Experience Advantage By Jacob Morgan

By Jacob Morgan

Research Shows Organizations That Focus on Employee Experience Far Outperform Those That Don’t

Recently a new type of organization has emerged, one that focuses on employee experiences as a way to drive innovation, increase customer satisfaction, find and hire the best people, make work more engaging, and improve overall performance. The Employee Experience Advantage is the first book of its kind to tackle this emerging topic that is becoming the #1 priority for business leaders around the world. Although everyone talks about employee experience nobody has really been able to explain concretely what it is and how to go about designing for it…until now.

How can organizations truly create a place where employees want to show up to work versus need to show up to work? For decades the business world has focused on measuring employee engagement meanwhile global engagement scores remain at an all time low despite all the surveys and institutes that been springing up tackle this problem. Clearly something is not working. Employee engagement has become the short-term adrenaline shot that organizations turn to when they need to increase their engagement scores. Instead, we have to focus on designing employee experiences which is the long term organizational design that leads to engaged employees. This is the only long-term solution. Organizations have been stuck focusing on the cause instead of the effect. The cause is employee experience; the effect is an engaged workforce.

Backed by an extensive research project that looked at over 150 studies and articles, featured extensive interviews with over 150 executives, and analyzed over 250 global organizations, this book clearly breaks down the three environments that make up every single employee experience at every organization around the world and how to design for them. These are the cultural, technological, and physical environments. This book explores the attributes that organizations need to focus on in each one of these environments to create COOL spaces, ACE technology, and a CELEBRATED culture. Featuring exclusive case studies, unique frameworks, and never before seen research, The Employee Experience Advantage guides readers on a journey of creating a place where people actually want to show up to work.

Readers will learn:

  • The trends shaping employee experience
  • How to evaluate their own employee experience using the Employee Experience Score
  • What the world’s leading organizations are doing around employee experience
  • How to design for technology, culture, and physical spaces
  • The role people analytics place in employee experience
  • Frameworks for how to actually create employee experiences
  • The role of the gig economy
  • The future of employee experience
  • Nine types of organizations that focus on employee experience
  • And much more!

There is no question that engaged employees perform better, aspire higher, and achieve more, but you can’t create employee engagement without designing employee experiences first. It’s time to rethink your strategy and implement a real-world framework that focuses on how to create an organization where people want to show up to work. The Employee Experience Advantage shows you how to do just that.

Take 10 Years Off Your Image

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By Stephen Viscusi, The Ladders

Suggestions on how to take 10 years off your image and be perceived as more youthful in the office.

How old an impression do you make when you’re interviewing? Of course, we all know that an interviewer can just count backward from the year of graduation printed on your resume. However, here is the truth: Perception is a new reality like 60 is the new 50. So you need to learn the fine art of being perceived as younger as well as looking younger. It’s more than just the way you look.

Is this fair? Is it even legal? And most importantly, should you give in to such nonsense? I’ll put it this way: If you are over 40, you need to read on.

Though the economy is much stronger, so is the penchant for mergers, acquisitions, and other organizational changes.  So now some bosses can use such events as a reason to thin the ranks.  And pay attention, over-40s:  A reduction in force is an especially perfect opportunity for higher-ups to fire those senior workers whose high wages and big egos have outlasted their welcome.

For those who are already unemployed, you must do whatever it takes to convey to hiring managers that you are employable. What does this mean? No one wants to hire someone who’s stuck in the old-fashioned way of thinking that being qualified, working hard and being loyal to a company is enough. Your Princeton degree and enviable references won’t get you far if you’re that naïve.

So back to the age thing.

While many workers have learned that good looks and a polished appearance go a long way toward success in the workplace, too many of them fail to realize that cultivating the perception of youth and a hip attitude is an equally important part of the equation. It’s no secret that we live in an age-obsessed society. Like it or not, “interviewing younger” is the new catchphrase.

“Interviewing younger” and being perceived as more youthful at the office is a vocabulary, a body language, and a look. And here’s a secret: These rules apply even more when your boss is your age or even older. It’s not like you are following these rules to impress a young person. Whatever the age of your boss or interviewer, you need to create a youthful perception about yourself. Otherwise, there’s someone else waiting in the wings with quicker computer skills and contemporary pop-culture knowledge who will be all too happy to fill your shoes.

So how do you do it? Here are some of the secrets in my new book, “Bulletproof Your Job” (HarperCollins), use them to remind yourself how to hold onto your job while those around you are losing theirs):

Crest Whitestrips.
Yup, this is a shallow, cosmetic-based tip. But I get so many letters from people who just don’t understand that having coffee-stained teeth doesn’t do you any favors in the interview department. Stop rolling your eyes; go buy the strips (use the store brand for all I care – I’m not picky), and whiten those teeth. Then smile. Smiling makes you look and feel younger – not bitter, old and unemployed. I don’t care if you really are bitter, old and unemployed. It’s about perception, remember?

If you are over 40, I want you on LinkedIn today.
If you don’t know how to join, just ask someone.  Let that same person help you choose your profile picture. Seriously.

Know about and frequently use Google and Wikipedia.
Bookmark them on your computer, and set one as your homepage.

Peruse your local Apple store.
At least learn the difference between an iPad, MacBook Pro, or Android and iOS, and you’re on your way.  And buy a set of those headphones to keep around. It’s all about perception.

Do not disclose your SAT scores.
If for some ungodly reason you still remember your SAT scores, keep them to yourself. Not only does no one care, but the scoring isn’t even the same anymore, and you’ll just wind up aging yourself.

Don’t talk about how you’re so addicted to Starbucks.
Or Coffee Bean, or whatever your coffee place of choice is. It seems like this would make you appear younger, but it won’t. Starbucks screams “unemployed loser.” Besides, you should never walk into an interview with a coffee cup, especially since you just whitened those teeth.

Pick up a copy of “Entertainment Weekly” before an interview.
But for God’s sake, don’t take it in with you and don’t let anyone see you reading it. That said, nothing gets you more up to date on the youthful world of pop culture like an issue of EW.

Learn how to text.
Many younger people do not use email.

Lose the paper.
Young people get their news online – they don’t read newspapers as much. So don’t carry one into an interview with you or be seen reading it at the office like someone’s mom or dad.

Brush up on sports.
This is easy; you can still get away with talking about Michael Phelps and get credit for this one. Bonus points for knowing who’s in the NCAA tournament.

Make eye contact.
Eye contact is so critical to being perceived as young; don’t be afraid to use it.

Rarely refer to your children.
Never refer to your grandchildren and never ever your great-grandchildren.

Go to the gym.
Or at least get moving.  Regular and brisk walks can work wonders.

Never talk about the ’80s or ’90s.
Never use words from “your day.” Nothing at work is groovy, dy-no-mite, or tubular. Ever.

Get a DVR.
Know how they work.

Practice “sounding young” on the phone.
Take a small survey of how old you sound on the phone, and then practice with a friend sounding younger. (A tip: Talk higher and peppier.) This is critical. In the same vein, make sure your outgoing voicemail message isn’t too long or boring. Short and sweet with a positive attitude is all you need.

Dress is very important: always dress age-appropriate.
It never works to try dressing like a millennial.

Give your hairstyle a long, hard look.
No wonder there are so many makeover shows! My advice is to ask an outsider his or her opinion. Someone who loves you won’t want to hurt your feelings or may love your look for sentimental or romantic reasons – but sadly, that won’t help you find a job. A bad coloring job spells disaster for both men and women, and let’s faces it, hair weaves for men rarely work. Men, don’t go overboard on finding a new hairstyle – just clip your nose and ear hair and you’re on the right track. Ladies, pluck or bleach facial hair.

Skip the cologne and excessive perfume.
And while we’re on the subject, wear deodorant. You may laugh, but many people just don’t do it.

Okay… Feel any younger, or just berated?

Trust me, I just took 15 years off the way you come across. Yeah, some things I talk about here are cosmetic, but most are not. It’s all about perception … and perception is a new reality.

Guide To Rethinking Resumes

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By Richard N. Bolles

The first resume book from the What Color Is Your Parachute? career guru Richard Bolles.

Resumes get an average of eight seconds of attention before going in the trash—or getting on the shortlist. That’s just one of the findings reported here, as legendary career expert Richard N. Bolles presents new research about resumes in a guide that summarizes everything job-hunters and career-changers need to know about this essential tool.

This timely resource features the latest research on important resume topics such as keywords, soft skills, scanning software, social media, and online posting. Bolles argues that on the basis of what we now know, we need to rethink what a resume is—and how it should be written. He details the words that must be avoided, and the words that must be used, on a resume that wins you interviews.

This slim volume distills a huge amount of information down to its very essence. Armed with tips and shortcuts based on the author’s decades of experience, you can craft a resume and cover letter that will stand out to your dream employers—and increase your chances of getting interviews and landing jobs.

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For expert resume help, contact:

The 21st Century Job Search

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By Bruce Hurwitz

Bruce Hurwitz has never been afraid of controversy, nor is he hesitant to admit when he is wrong. Accordingly, in The 21st Century Job Search, he revisits his previous comments on such things as wearing large engagement rings to job interviews, his short-lived position as a career coach at a New York university, and coping with discrimination, topics which raised some eyebrows when he originally wrote about them on LinkedIn.

In the book you will learn:

  • How to prepare for an effective job search;
  • How to research prospective employers;
  • How to handle your Internet presence;
  • How to utilize LinkedIn to build your brand and attract employers;
  • How to effectively network – especially if you are shy;
  • How to prepare for surprises;
  • How to correctly read job descriptions to avoid frustration;
  • What really happens to, and how to write, effective cover letters;
  • What really happens to, and how to write, effective resumes;
  • How to properly prepare for phone, video and in-person interviews;
  • What questions to ask, and how to answers questions you will be asked, in interviews;
  • How to follow-up after an interview;
  • About legal and illegal discrimination; and
  • About negotiating, offer letters and resigning.

Hurwitz also tackles the “tough” issues of dealing with a “resume gap,” raising health issues, and how to turn having been a stay-at-home parent or caregiver into an attraction for employers.

But he does not simply tell readers what to do, when possible, he shows them. There is a script, especially for the shy, for effective networking and follow up. Additionally, readers will find sample letters for networking, expressing interest in a company, applying for jobs, thanking interviewers and, his personal favorite, the rejection letter.

While in the book he gives particular advice to veterans, college students, “older” candidates, the long-term unemployed, stay-at-home parents, and caregivers about how to minimize rejection and reduce frustration, and effectively cope with the different stages of a job search, the book is for any job seeker regardless of their circumstances.

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For expert resume help, contact:

Land Your Dream Job Anywhere

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By Mac Prichard

Job hunting is not an innate ability; no one is born with the magical power to land a great job. It is a learned skill that anyone can master with practice. Unfortunately, most people are never taught how to look for a job. High school and college teach us the technical skills to use in our career, but we are never taught the nuts-and-bolts of how to conduct a strategic job search. Instead, we are left mostly to rely on trial and error. That’s the reason this book exists—to outline a proven job-search strategy that actually works. You’ll find a process that results in a faster, less-frustrating job search—one that maximizes your chances of finding a job you love

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For expert resume help, contact: 

Cracking the Coding Interview

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Cracking the Coding Interview, 6th Edition is here to help you through this process, teaching you what you need to know and enabling you to perform at your very best. I’ve coached and interviewed hundreds of software engineers. The result is this book.

Learn how to uncover the hints and hidden details in a question, discover how to break down a problem into manageable chunks, develop techniques to unstick yourself when stuck, learn (or re-learn) core computer science concepts, and practice on 189 interview questions and solutions.

These interview questions are real; they are not pulled out of computer science textbooks. They reflect what’s truly being asked at the top companies, so that you can be as prepared as possible. WHAT’S INSIDE?

  • 189 programming interview questions, ranging from the basics to the trickiest algorithm problems.
  • A walk-through of how to derive each solution, so that you can learn how to get there yourself.
  • Hints on how to solve each of the 189 questions, just like what you would get in a real interview.
  • Five proven strategies to tackle algorithm questions, so that you can solve questions you haven’t seen.
  • Extensive coverage of essential topics, such as big O time, data structures, and core algorithms.
  • A behind the scenes look at how top companies like Google and Facebook hire developers.
  • Techniques to prepare for and ace the soft side of the interview: behavioral questions.
  • For interviewers and companies: details on what makes a good interview question and hiring process

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Smile, You’re On Video-Conference! Overcoming Obstacles When Job Interviewing

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By Karen Friedman

In today’s competitive job market, companies are looking for ways to save money when interviewing prospective job candidates.  For many, that means being interviewed by satellite or video conference versus a trip to the home office.  How can you shine?  What do you need to know about making a good impression from miles away?

It’s all the rage especially if your company is doing a little belt tightening and you can score some points by saving a few bucks. Instead of paying for travel expenses and spending your free time whining and dining a lot of potential job candidates, what about speeding up the time consuming process by conducting the interview during a videoconference that is inexpensive by comparison? Companies can save time until they’ve narrowed the search and job seekers can try to impress without traveling to all corners of the globe. After all, universities offer videoconference lecture series and companies frequently use the technology to hold global meetings. In fact, a study on web conferencing quoted in HR Magazine shows the market jumping nearly 300 percent between 2005 and 2011, to $2.9 billion. So clearly, the technology is certainly gaining popularity. The question is: to whose advantage?

While there are clearly benefits, from where I sit as a communications coach, there are also a host of barriers that prevent job candidates from feeling at ease and making their best impression. How can you possibly connect with someone and make them feel who you really are if you can’t shake their hand and look them directly in the eye? It’s like buying a car without taking it for a test drive. Given that first impressions are critical, if the job applicant is unfamiliar with the technology, appears nervous or looks off, then decision makers may form incorrect impressions. Then there’s the lighting issue. If the lighting isn’t good, the applicant can look pasty or washed out. Additionally, there are often delays as video and audio are compressed and transmitted between locations. So, that means people unknowingly talk over each other or try to fill the silence without realizing that those on the other end of the connection are still listening to someone’s response. On the other side of the screen, interviewers often forget that they are also visible and need to make a good impression. That means no slouching, checking e-mail; leafing through magazines and making potential employees feel as if they’re boring you.

Like any interview or presentation, the key to success is for both sides to prepare in advance. The first step would be to set up a phone call and talk about videoconferencing etiquette.

PHONE PRIMERS – Before the interview, the company should schedule a phone call with the applicant to explain video protocol. For example, tell them how the room will be set up, who will be there, where to look, how wide the video image will be or what technical issues could arise. Can they interrupt? Who will hear them? Will there be feedback or delay time? What’s the format and how much time will they have? It’s up to the company to send a message that says they want the interview to be successful for the prospect.

THINK TV – Appearing for a video interview is a bit like being on TV. You have to connect with people you can’t see so it’s important to engage your audience quickly. In most cases, you want to look directly into the camera so you seem completely attentive to the people on the other side of the screen. The trick is to appear natural and not over focus on the camera which is very hard for an untrained person to do. Instead, pretend that camera is one person. As a former television reporter, I used to speak to more than one million people every evening. By pretending the camera was my Mom or a friend, it was easier to speak from the heart and focus on the information I wanted to convey. It’s also important to gesture and use your hands so you’re animated, but movements can be magnified on the screen so aim for smaller, smoother movements.

DRESS FOR SUCCESS – What looks good in your mirror doesn’t always translate to the big screen. The number one rule is to wear what makes you feel good as long as it doesn’t distract from your message. For women, that means leaving big earrings, frilly tops and clunky jewelry at home. But putting on some lipstick, eyeliner and a little blush will prevent you from looking washed out. Both sexes should avoid small patterns like checks and tweeds which can “bleed” on screen. As for colors, warm bright colors typically look great, but if that’s not your style, think contrast such as a white shirt with a navy blazer as opposed to just a white shirt. And men, a viewer’s eye will go straight to your tie, so make it a good one! Finally, find out what the background is. If you’re up against a green screen and you wear green, oops, you’ll disappear.

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT – Set up a video camera and practice with a pal who can ask you questions and offer feedback. Play it back and check your body language, expressions and pace. Are you talking too fast? Are you speaking loud enough? Do you look friendly and approachable?

While videoconferencing should not replace face to face interviewing, as technology gets easierScience Articles, so will video interviewing. And the job of tomorrow may very well come down to the person who seems at ease on camera.

 

How to Write an Amazing IT Resume: Get the Interview Every Time

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By Baron Fendler

I have been in the Recruiting field for over 15 years and have never read a more accurate, clear, and easy to follow guide on how to write a resume.
– Kalimar Petitt, Recruiting Manager, IMDb (an Amazon subsidiary)

Just released, a resume book created for IT professionals! Whether you’re looking for your first IT job, or you’re a veteran with years of information technology experience, this book has everything you need.

In How to Write an Amazing IT Resume, you’ll discover:

  • What information to include in your IT resume header (and what to leave off!)
  • How to get your resume past the automated screener
  • Why hiring managers like candidates who wear more than one hat (and how to show that kind of versatility)
  • Specific ways to show that you meet the IT recruiter’s checklist
  • How to write an impressive IT career summary (that short paragraph at the top of your resume)
  • Why stealing bullet points from other resumes doesn’t work (and how to build your own instead!)
  • How to turn basic bullet points into hooks (and 24 real-world IT examples of initial bullets transformed into attention-grabbing hooks)
  • Ways to submit your IT resume that will increase your chance of landing an interview
  • How to demonstrate well-roundedness, that elusive quality that IT hiring managers really notice

This invaluable career guide also includes:

  • 13 outstanding examples of career summaries for almost every type of IT job
  • A comprehensive skills list with over 160 technical, management, business, and life skills
  • 120 impact verbs you can use to start your bullet points
  • Resume grammar rules and formatting guidelines
  • A proofreading checklist so you don’t get torpedoed by common mistakes

How to Write an Amazing IT Resume also contains a dedicated chapter for each core type of IT job. In each of these chapters, we explain exactly what you need to do to sell yourself for that type of job.

Perfect for:

  • IT business analysts
  • Technical analysts
  • Developers / Programmers
  • Web designers
  • IT consultants
  • Helpdesk technicians
  • Systems administrators
  • Network architects
  • Software engineers
  • IT managers and directors

When it comes to resume writing, there is a mountain of misinformation out there. Many other books (and blogs) contain out-of-date, irrelevant, or just plain poor advice. You can try your luck elsewhere. OR you can read this book, which walks through the whole process from A to Z and is endorsed by numerous IT hiring managers and recruiters.

Why not take the next step in your information technology career right now? A resume might be the most important thing you ever write. Order this book today.

tags: how to write a resume, CV writing, resume writing, IT interviewing, job hunting, software development, IT consulting, job search, find a job, career guide, IT management

7 Important Questions Every Job Seeker Should Ask Themselves

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By Gordon Walter

Whether you’re just beginning the job hunt or you’ve been searching for months, it’s important to regularly monitor your activities and reevaluate your strategy. Keep your job search on track by asking yourself the following questions throughout the job-search process.

Am I qualified for this position?

Read the job description carefully before you submit an application. Do you meet the core requirements of the role? Only apply to jobs where you possess these must-haves. If your dream job requires a skill you don’t have, brainstorm ways to develop this skill in or out of the office.

Does my resume tell the right story?

Having the right skills is half the battle; having an application that demonstrates your qualifications is the other half. Consider your resume to be part of your personal marketing campaign. It should show potential employers why you are qualified for, and excited about, your target position.

Do I know someone at the company I can talk to?

Studies have shown you are ten times more likely to land a job when your application is accompanied by an employee referral. Search your network before you apply to a position. If your network is stale, it’s time to get out there and make new connections! .

Have I Googled my name this month?

A Jobvite survey found that 93 percent of recruiters are likely to look at a candidate’s social profile. Additionally, 42 percent have reconsidered a candidate based on the content of their online profiles, leading to both positive and negative re-assessments. Regularly monitor and manage your online brand to ensure it supports your goals, rather than sabotaging them.

What have I learned recently?

Whether you’re looking to climb up the corporate ladder or you’re currently unemployed and seeking work, it’s important to continually seek out relevant professional development activities. By learning new technologies, attending workshops and gaining certifications, you are becoming a more attractive candidate and opening yourself up to new networking opportunities.

Have I stepped outside my comfort zone to find new job leads?

Oftentimes job seekers will default to the one job-search method that’s most comfortable to them. However, it’s important to employ multiple methods to find the largest number of relevant job leads. Apply to opportunities online, engage in recruiter activity, and leverage your network.

Am I ready for the interview?

Don’t set foot in the interview room unless you’ve researched the organization and prepared thoughtful questions for the interviewer. Employers want to know that you’ve done your homework and are taking the interview seriously.