Category Archives: Networking

Guide To Rethinking Resumes

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By Richard N. Bolles

The first resume book from the What Color Is Your Parachute? career guru Richard Bolles.

Resumes get an average of eight seconds of attention before going in the trash—or getting on the shortlist. That’s just one of the findings reported here, as legendary career expert Richard N. Bolles presents new research about resumes in a guide that summarizes everything job-hunters and career-changers need to know about this essential tool.

This timely resource features the latest research on important resume topics such as keywords, soft skills, scanning software, social media, and online posting. Bolles argues that on the basis of what we now know, we need to rethink what a resume is—and how it should be written. He details the words that must be avoided, and the words that must be used, on a resume that wins you interviews.

This slim volume distills a huge amount of information down to its very essence. Armed with tips and shortcuts based on the author’s decades of experience, you can craft a resume and cover letter that will stand out to your dream employers—and increase your chances of getting interviews and landing jobs.

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The 21st Century Job Search

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By Bruce Hurwitz

Bruce Hurwitz has never been afraid of controversy, nor is he hesitant to admit when he is wrong. Accordingly, in The 21st Century Job Search, he revisits his previous comments on such things as wearing large engagement rings to job interviews, his short-lived position as a career coach at a New York university, and coping with discrimination, topics which raised some eyebrows when he originally wrote about them on LinkedIn.

In the book you will learn:

  • How to prepare for an effective job search;
  • How to research prospective employers;
  • How to handle your Internet presence;
  • How to utilize LinkedIn to build your brand and attract employers;
  • How to effectively network – especially if you are shy;
  • How to prepare for surprises;
  • How to correctly read job descriptions to avoid frustration;
  • What really happens to, and how to write, effective cover letters;
  • What really happens to, and how to write, effective resumes;
  • How to properly prepare for phone, video and in-person interviews;
  • What questions to ask, and how to answers questions you will be asked, in interviews;
  • How to follow-up after an interview;
  • About legal and illegal discrimination; and
  • About negotiating, offer letters and resigning.

Hurwitz also tackles the “tough” issues of dealing with a “resume gap,” raising health issues, and how to turn having been a stay-at-home parent or caregiver into an attraction for employers.

But he does not simply tell readers what to do, when possible, he shows them. There is a script, especially for the shy, for effective networking and follow up. Additionally, readers will find sample letters for networking, expressing interest in a company, applying for jobs, thanking interviewers and, his personal favorite, the rejection letter.

While in the book he gives particular advice to veterans, college students, “older” candidates, the long-term unemployed, stay-at-home parents, and caregivers about how to minimize rejection and reduce frustration, and effectively cope with the different stages of a job search, the book is for any job seeker regardless of their circumstances.

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For expert resume help, contact: