Category Archives: Networking

Secrets to Finding an Executive Position While Still Employed

Share

By Erin Kennedy 

Following are highlights from Erin’s article:  “The Secrets to Finding an Executive Position While Still Employed”

Think Outside the “Networking” Box

  • There are many ways to network.
  • The hidden job market is the best way to go about conducting a secret job search.
    • Attending professional events or using the tools offered by LinkedIn, are excellent ways to learn about jobs not yet advertised.
  • Even volunteering or being involved in your community can lead to new opportunities, so being active can move your job search forward as well.

Be Careful When Using LinkedIn

  • Use LinkedIn when searching for a new job.
    • Begin by updating settings.
      • If settings are not updated appropriately, connections may be able to see every change to profile.
    • Remember that co-workers and bosses are often included as members of the Connections network.
    • When working on LinkedIn profile development, alter settings to ensure the wrong people don’t see any changes made.

Strictly Confidential

  • It’s important to keep things under wraps, until ready to go public. Keep things confidential.
    • Use the term “confidential applicant” instead of name, to avoid showing up on the current employer’s search for a new candidate.
    • Not using the company’s name anywhere on the resume is important.

Don’t Use Company Time

  • Job searches should not be done on company time.
    • If your current boss finds out, there’s a chance you could be fired.
    • If a potential employer finds out search was conducted on company time, they may think you’ll do the same to them and not offer you a job.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Erin_Kennedy/161383

Job Search Tips – What Phrases Should You Use on Job Search Sites?

Share

By Adnan Masood   

If you are looking for a job, you are likely to search online. The good news? There are many job search sites for you to choose from. Aside from the larger and well-known sites, there are also those that are locally run and operated. Regardless of which website you use, how you search is very important. After all, the fastest way to seek employment is to find jobs that you are qualified for.

In terms of searching for job search sites, how can you do this?

Here are three different ways that you can find open positions that you are qualified for online:

Job Search Tip #1 – Search with the Job Title Name.  This is a pretty simple approach, yet it is the best. What position are you looking to find? Is it a retail manager? If so, ideal search phrases include retail management, retail manager, or store manager. Is it a work at home sales position? If so, ideal search phrases include home-based sales, inbound sales rep, work at home sales, and so forth.

Job search sites pull keywords from your search and pair it with keywords inside a job listing. Since a company always labels a job with the title, this method of searching produces the best results.

Job Search Tip #2 – Search with Job Duty.  Another way to find a job on a job search site is to do a search with a duty. For example, a retail worker often must perform sales work, customer service, and checking out customers. Ideal search phrases include customer service, cashier, sales, and so forth.

As previously stated, job search sites pull keywords from your search phrase and attempt to match up those phrases with keywords inside a job listing posted online. While the best results are produced by using a job title, you can search with a job duty instead as well. The only downside is that some duties are similar for a wide range of jobs; therefore, you are likely to get more non-relevant results with this approach.

Job Search Tip #3 – Search with Company Name.  Do you want to work for a specific company? If so, you can also do a search with that company name. If you are looking for a better paying job, this approach is ideal. However, if you are looking for any decent position that will provide a paycheck now, it is best to use one of the above-mentioned options that produce more results.

While this method of searching job sites does work, results are not guaranteed. Why? While a good percentage of companies do include their company name, some like to keep this information hidden. While it won’t hurt to use this method of searching when seeking employment, know that you do have other options. You should use those other options if your search does not produce any results.

So there you have it; you now got a few great suggestions on the different methods of searching when it comes to looking for employment on job search sites.

Guide To Rethinking Resumes

Share

By Richard N. Bolles

The first resume book from the What Color Is Your Parachute? career guru Richard Bolles.

Resumes get an average of eight seconds of attention before going in the trash—or getting on the shortlist. That’s just one of the findings reported here, as legendary career expert Richard N. Bolles presents new research about resumes in a guide that summarizes everything job-hunters and career-changers need to know about this essential tool.

This timely resource features the latest research on important resume topics such as keywords, soft skills, scanning software, social media, and online posting. Bolles argues that on the basis of what we now know, we need to rethink what a resume is—and how it should be written. He details the words that must be avoided, and the words that must be used, on a resume that wins you interviews.

This slim volume distills a huge amount of information down to its very essence. Armed with tips and shortcuts based on the author’s decades of experience, you can craft a resume and cover letter that will stand out to your dream employers—and increase your chances of getting interviews and landing jobs.

__________________________________________________________________________

For expert resume help, contact:

The 21st Century Job Search

Share

By Bruce Hurwitz

Bruce Hurwitz has never been afraid of controversy, nor is he hesitant to admit when he is wrong. Accordingly, in The 21st Century Job Search, he revisits his previous comments on such things as wearing large engagement rings to job interviews, his short-lived position as a career coach at a New York university, and coping with discrimination, topics which raised some eyebrows when he originally wrote about them on LinkedIn.

In the book you will learn:

  • How to prepare for an effective job search;
  • How to research prospective employers;
  • How to handle your Internet presence;
  • How to utilize LinkedIn to build your brand and attract employers;
  • How to effectively network – especially if you are shy;
  • How to prepare for surprises;
  • How to correctly read job descriptions to avoid frustration;
  • What really happens to, and how to write, effective cover letters;
  • What really happens to, and how to write, effective resumes;
  • How to properly prepare for phone, video and in-person interviews;
  • What questions to ask, and how to answers questions you will be asked, in interviews;
  • How to follow-up after an interview;
  • About legal and illegal discrimination; and
  • About negotiating, offer letters and resigning.

Hurwitz also tackles the “tough” issues of dealing with a “resume gap,” raising health issues, and how to turn having been a stay-at-home parent or caregiver into an attraction for employers.

But he does not simply tell readers what to do, when possible, he shows them. There is a script, especially for the shy, for effective networking and follow up. Additionally, readers will find sample letters for networking, expressing interest in a company, applying for jobs, thanking interviewers and, his personal favorite, the rejection letter.

While in the book he gives particular advice to veterans, college students, “older” candidates, the long-term unemployed, stay-at-home parents, and caregivers about how to minimize rejection and reduce frustration, and effectively cope with the different stages of a job search, the book is for any job seeker regardless of their circumstances.

___________________________________________________________________________

For expert resume help, contact: