Category Archives: Resume Help

Sell Yourself In One Page

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Resume writing is a tricky business. On one hand, affording the opportunity to determine precisely the best first impression is invaluable. On the other hand, a single page to make an impression is an anxiety-driven exercise in frustration. [Please do not make your resume multiple pages. Ten years of experience is sufficient and a desired position with have a hundred resumes; you’ll move to the bottom of the pile.] Be disciplined and follow these straightforward tips to get every job you apply for, guaranteed. (Editor’s Note: This publication does not support this guarantee and thinks there are far too many factors to determine anything like this with even remote certainty.)

I will let you in on a few secrets:
1. The perfect resume is unattainable.
2. An attractive resume will not guarantee an interview.
3. Resume writing is, like most endeavors, more Sisyphus than we would like to admit.

Don’t surrender, there are still ways to make it easier and, for secrets one and two, less daunting. As for your own personal boulder, you will have to choose how many times you want to climb the hill…

Relevant work experience coupled with education/training fleshes out a resume very well. Some encourage embellishment to create the veneer of the perfect candidate, but I think it is unnecessary and dishonest. If you don’t speak Cantonese, don’t say you studied the language for four years. Besides, a good hiring manager will see through a facade during the interview and the position will go to someone qualified.

Without a large amount of relevant work experience, a relevant skill set can be emphasized. I have a section of Professional Skills I utilize in my resume. You can point out attributes you possess making you attractive to employers. If you don’t know your professional skills, self-examination is important. You will be asked similar questions in most interviews.

Another focused section to fill out a sparse or meandering resume is a Career Objective. Stating what you are looking for and why at the very top of the page can get right to the point in the way a flashy resume cannot. In addition, the section may be the only complete sentence on your resume. Communication will always be a an envied skill and displaying an ability to write well is a opportunity you would be remiss to pass up.

Having the perfect resume with background and training may still be a hindrance (i.e. Secret #2). The perfect candidate might appear transient and likely to move on to a different position sooner or too expensive for the planned budget of the position. If a hiring manager views you as overqualified, you might be passed over for the interview. This may seem silly, but it happens.

Enthusiasm and a willingness to adopt the policies and procedures of your new company is as valuable if not more valuable than a track record of displaying skills for several places. Youth relies on this truism, but a recent change in fields can offer the same opportunity. Putting yourself out there for the first time or for the first time in a long time takes courage. You showed courage, now take the recognition for it.

If you are looking for a new job or plan to look in the near future, you have not written your resume.

Resumes should be catered to a job (at least a little). The resume you turn in for one company should be altered for the next company and so on and so forth. Downloading the CV or resume templates from Microsoft Word should only serve as a jumping off point. If it was easy to create, it will show and effort matters, especially for the next potential career. If you don’t have time to create a wow-factor resume, you don’t really want a new job. Keep the sections which always impress as your resume evolves and it will be easier to turn on the wow when you need to.

Most of the time, the job description is written by the hiring manager, except in cases of talent pipelining (truly an honorable endeavor and the future of hiring). Knowing this, it is smart to borrow language from the job description and integrate it directly into your resume.

e.g. Seeking a personable teacher, well-versed in Economics with a passion for students.

School Mission: We are an equal-opportunity school with a foundation for teachers. We are expanding and seeking a team to grow with us.

Under Professional Skills, you can write: Passionate about education

As a Career Objective, you can right: Seeking a school with a strong foundation and the potential to grow with a team of like-minded teachers.

Simple, direct and subtle psychological tricks that tell the interviewer during the review, you are the type of candidate they should meet with. If you’re thinking I am above embellishment but not above inspiring projection, you’re right. The psychological shifts attention where it belongs – on how amazing you are. The embellishment puts focus on things you wish were you or what you think they want. I, like your mother, believe you are talented and deserve every opportunity to show how capable you are. Now, type to your heart’s content and practice answering interview questions in the mirror. You’re going to be great!

This article was written by Shan S. Haider. Shan has worked as an English teacher and currently is the head of consulting at Prudential First Egitim. An Istanbul based company responsible for providing foreign teachers to private schools. If you’d like to work as an English teacher overseas and experience a different culture while earning good money then get in touch. you can contact him at shan@prudentialfirst.com. http://www.prudentialfirst.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Shan_S_Haider/2303190

7 Important Questions Every Job Seeker Should Ask Themselves

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By Gordon Walter

Whether you’re just beginning the job hunt or you’ve been searching for months, it’s important to regularly monitor your activities and reevaluate your strategy. Keep your job search on track by asking yourself the following questions throughout the job-search process.

Am I qualified for this position?

Read the job description carefully before you submit an application. Do you meet the core requirements of the role? Only apply to jobs where you possess these must-haves. If your dream job requires a skill you don’t have, brainstorm ways to develop this skill in or out of the office.

Does my resume tell the right story?

Having the right skills is half the battle; having an application that demonstrates your qualifications is the other half. Consider your resume to be part of your personal marketing campaign. It should show potential employers why you are qualified for, and excited about, your target position.

Do I know someone at the company I can talk to?

Studies have shown you are ten times more likely to land a job when your application is accompanied by an employee referral. Search your network before you apply to a position. If your network is stale, it’s time to get out there and make new connections! .

Have I Googled my name this month?

A Jobvite survey found that 93 percent of recruiters are likely to look at a candidate’s social profile. Additionally, 42 percent have reconsidered a candidate based on the content of their online profiles, leading to both positive and negative re-assessments. Regularly monitor and manage your online brand to ensure it supports your goals, rather than sabotaging them.

What have I learned recently?

Whether you’re looking to climb up the corporate ladder or you’re currently unemployed and seeking work, it’s important to continually seek out relevant professional development activities. By learning new technologies, attending workshops and gaining certifications, you are becoming a more attractive candidate and opening yourself up to new networking opportunities.

Have I stepped outside my comfort zone to find new job leads?

Oftentimes job seekers will default to the one job-search method that’s most comfortable to them. However, it’s important to employ multiple methods to find the largest number of relevant job leads. Apply to opportunities online, engage in recruiter activity, and leverage your network.

Am I ready for the interview?

Don’t set foot in the interview room unless you’ve researched the organization and prepared thoughtful questions for the interviewer. Employers want to know that you’ve done your homework and are taking the interview seriously.

 

Find Your Fit: A Practical Guide to Landing a Job You’ll Love

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By Sue Kaiden

You want no, you need a new job. But not just any job. The job. So you polish your resume till it shines. You apply for countless openings, tailoring your message to each. You search for the hidden job market, although it remains very well hidden. And the response? Well, it’s underwhelming. To top things off, maze-like online application systems appear designed to keep you and the perfect job apart. What’s going on?

How people successfully land jobs has changed. You need help from a pro, someone who navigates career data, the labor market, and hot jobs with ease. You want a coach who will tell you what to pursue and what to avoid, and an expert who has mastered job-hunting and career change to offer wisdom gained from experience. What you need is a career coach. Better yet, several.

Expert career coaches contributing to this volume include Lakeisha Mathews, Dan Schwartz, Sheila Margolis, Alisa Cohn, Michelle Riklan, Marie Zimenoff, Laura Labovich, Lynne Williams, Thea Kelley, Jean Juchnowicz, Alan DeBack, Marilyn Feldstein, Vivian Blade, David Hosmer, Barbara Seifert, and Nicole Miller.

Find Your Fit guides you through answering foundational questions like: What do I want to do with my career? Where should I do it? And how do I get there? As you develop a strong sense of self-awareness, you’ll be able to identify the work environment best for you, shape your online identity, and network more effectively by focusing on people instead of openings. You’ll learn about coveted employee referrals, and how to get one at your target company. With the help of experienced career coaches, you’ll be able to handle any kind of interview. And, you’ll become familiar with the pre-employment testing and assessments increasingly common today.

What are you waiting for? Your personal coaching session awaits

Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters, Unlock Linkedin

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By Dr. Karen Gurney

If you are a busy professional that is seeking to get calls for jobs without applying by tapping recruiters — then you want this book.  Now Book Comes with Bonus Online Class & Templates!
My Story and Why This Book is for You
I have been working in the recruiting industry as an Executive Search Consultant and Career Coach since 2004, but something happened in 2015 that completely changed how I worked, literally overnight.
A Digital Marketing Manager came to me as a client after failing to get a job. He had searched for a year and could barely get a call for a job interview. Before I started his job search campaign, I checked his LinkedIn.com profile to make sure it looked good.
His LinkedIn profile was absolutely horrifying.
The picture was a selfie that looked like a mugshot following a police interrogation. His profile had too much information that was irrelevant to his goals, his headline was meaningless, and he only had 24 connections. There was no way I could position someone that was supposed to be an expert in digital marketing with this repellent LinkedIn profile.
My client was absolutely desperate for job.
He was a nice guy and a good job candidate with a lot of related experience. I used to just give online profile tips but I knew time was of the essence and I needed to take control of his online image immediately.
I got his logins for LinkedIn and other online job boards to re-align everything.
Within 48 hours he had over 300 Linkedin connections and one job interview. By the end of the week, he had four job interviews and had hit the 500+ connection mark and …
He had not applied for a single job! Not one!
All the job interviews he got were from his online profiles. This method is now the core of my career coaching practice.
So what is the secret? It is just one phrase: Keyword-stacking.
Once you learn how to keyword-stack your profiles, you will get calls too.

What You Will Be Able to Do After This Book

• Have recruiters come straight to you for great jobs
• Get calls for jobs without applying
• Tap unadvertised jobs in the hidden job market

BONUS: You Also Get FREE access to my $200 Award-winning Class which includes

• My copyrighted ‘Core-3©’ career assessment
• Fill-in-the-blank interview preparation scripts
• Salary negotiation scripts and so much more!

Reviews from my 5-Star Online Course

“I bought this on Kindle for $3.99, and it’s probably the best investment I’ve made in my job search.” Garden Goddess
“Concise, efficient, effective. With amazingly helpful downloadable content (just copy and paste into document)…Generates results, works for every industry and all job levels.” by Kevin Massabni,
“Best-practices how-to book, and integrated video..” Paula Dee

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Karen Gurney was born, raised, and lives in Cleveland Ohio with her husband, two Goldendoodles, and a Papillon. As a Clevelander, she grew up living with the decline and rebirth of a city that displaced countless professionals and families. This fostered her interest in urban economics, workforce development, and job markets resulting in her unique market-based strategies.
Karen has 20 years of combined experience in executive search consulting, career coaching, and human resources. As the Director of Strategic Development of Career IQ, she leverages a Doctorate in Economic and Workforce Development and a Masters in Business Administration. Dr. Gurney’s work has been featured on major U.S. news networks and she currently has eight online classes that teach career and business strategies in over 100 countries assisting over 8,000 students in their career pursuits.

Don’t Put These 5 Things in Your Resume

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Executive resumes deserve just as much attention as a resume for any other job. You may be surprised to know most resumes for executive positions are generally poorly done. However, that just gives you the opportunity to shine brightly when it comes to your resume! Your executive bio needs to stand out from the rest. Most importantly, it needs to be error-free and you need to avoid putting some things in it altogether. We’ve compiled a list of five common, but unnecessary, things people put in their executive resumes.

Too Wordy
As an executive, you likely have many accomplishments and all of them are important to you. However, if you put too much on your resume, recruiters may stop reading it and move on to the next one. The best executive resume writers will include two or three key points to highlight skills and then move on. Think concise. Ask yourself, “Does this need to be on here?” You don’t want to overwhelm recruiters on paper.

Omitting Keywords
In today’s digital world, most resumes are scanned online for specific keywords pertaining to the job. Sometimes the keywords are more important than the substance in the resume. Look at the job description and use a lot of the words they use to describe the job. If you need help identifying specific keywords, you can always reach out to an executive resume service for assistance.

Focusing Too Much on Job Descriptions
Talk briefly about your job duties at your past jobs, but focus more on what you accomplished in those roles. Everyone can describe what they did at a particular job, but highlighting how well you did your job looks much better on paper.

Not Highlighting Achievements
This is where you need to use numbers and percentages to show how you made an impact in your previous jobs. Your executive bio will be much stronger if you say you “increased sales by 40 percent over 12 months” rather than just saying you “helped boost sales.” Be specific about your achievements so your next employer knows what you have to offer before you even step foot in their office.

Not Targeting Your Prospective Employer
Having a generic resume may be fine if you’re applying for a lower level position, but you need to do a little more work upfront for an executive level position. Do some research about the job and company you’re applying to. Identify how you can help them and include those points in your resume. The best executive resume writers will focus more on how they can help potential hirers, rather than what they’ve done in the past.

Erin Kennedy, MCD, CERW, CMRW, CEMC, CPRW, BS/HR, is a Certified Executive Resume Writer & Career Consultant, and the Managing Director of Professional Resume Services, Inc. She is a nationally published writer and contributor of 16 best-selling career books.

She has achieved international recognition following yearly nominations of the prestigious T.O.R.I. (Toast of the Resume Industry) Award. She is also one of only a few professionals worldwide to achieve the coveted “Certified Master Resume Writer” distinction. With over 17 years of writing experience behind her, Erin has written thousands of resumes for every career level and every industry.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Erin_Kennedy/161383

Does Your Cover Letter Let You Down

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Getting that competitive advantage in a crowded job market can be a challenge. One of the best tools you have outside of your Resume is a compelling Cover Letter that has fresh, engaging content that clearly outlines why you are the best fit for the role.

This is the perfect opportunity to present to the Recruiter or Hiring Manager a number of compelling reasons why you should move to the next stage of the process, an interview.

Ensure you have read and understood the role requirements and what is needed to succeed and put forward why you, meet and exceed those key requirements.

Nothing captures the attention of a Recruiter or Hiring Manager more than a well-tailored document highlighting why you, as a potential employee meet those requirements. Also, provide some specific examples in the document.

While this may take some time to complete, the investment can be worth it, regardless if you undertake the document yourself, or get a professional service provider to undertake the work for you.

Don’t leave a Recruiter or Hiring Manager to read between the lines in your Resume, put forward why you meet the requirements and what you will bring to the role – be clear on the value you will add to the business.

A couple of key things to consider:

Spelling and Grammar: check your spelling and grammar (get a trusted friend to review your document or use a resume service provider such as Resumes to you).

Content: ensure your content is fresh, exciting and not a simple copy and past of your resume content.

Format: format your document in a standard professional layout. Your cover letter is a first impression and you want to make the right impact. If it’s badly formatted, it could negatively impact your chances.

Personalise your cover letter: If you know the recruiters name, address the letter to them. Add the name and address of the company and add the position name as the reference. (personalising your cover letter will have a positive impact).

Double check: Before you hit send, make sure you have attached the correct documents, especially when sending. Sending an application for a job addressed to the wrong company or recruiter could kill your chances. It looks unprofessional, sloppy, and demonstrates lack of care or attention to detail.

Fixing an issue: If you send an application and suddenly realise that you have sent an incorrect document, don’t forget about it… contact the recruiter and inform them that you have sent the wrong document and arrange to send the correct items – you’ll be surprised how this can work for you.

There are other things to consider, based on your needs when developing a cover letter.

One of the best investments you can make is to have your cover letter reviewed and, if needed, professionally rewritten to improve your chances in a competitive and crowded market.

If you have errors or your document is poorly written, that could cost you dearly during your application process, so checking these few items could make all the difference.

Resumes for you:
https://www.resumesforyou.com.au

Resumes for you: Tip of the week
https://www.resumesforyou.com.au/tip-week-cover-letter/

Winning the Interview

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Some people think that preparing for a job interview is fairly simple. Once you get the call to come in for one you essentially have the job unless you blow the interview. This is not to disrespect Walmart or McDonald’s but unless you are applying for a company like that, the interview process is not easy at all. In fact, getting the interview more times than not is easier than the actual interview itself. This pillar post is going to be for my viewers that are looking for a full-time job and hopefully it’s a highly looked at company.

The first step is having a great resume. There are plenty of good examples on the internet for samples but those are also mixed in with bad ones. Some keys things that you want in your resume are; having as many numbers as possible. It’s much more eye opening for an employer to see you raised over $10,000 in revenue during your 8 week internship than saying you raised a lot of money. Another thing is to make sure the formatting is done correctly. Make sure that everything lines up nicely and that you stay consistent on your word usage such as tenses. Also make sure to use a different starting word for the description of your prior positions. Then there are the more basic things such as make sure there are no spelling or grammar mistakes because that can instantly lose you an interview chance. LinkedIn is similar to your resume but where your resume should only include your most important and relevant things since it should only be a single full page, your LinkedIn page should include everything you’ve done. It should be a page that an employer can visit and see where you went to school, what you did there, how you did there, strengths, weaknesses, and any jobs you had up to this point.

Now if a company has asked you to come in for an interview, this is where you start researching that company. Everyone has many strengths and weaknesses, but this is where you need to see the companies values and what not and tie your best strengths to those values. It’s also where if you have a weakness of time management and their biggest thing is to have great time management, that’s a weakness you shouldn’t bring up. This next part isn’t always possible but now a days companies will let you know who you are interviewing with or it is the HR recruiter who told you that you have an interview. This is where you should look up the interviewer on LinkedIn, connect with them and learn some things about them. That way you can ask them questions more directed at them at the end of the interview. You should also ask your recruiter what specific position you are interviewing for so that you can plan accordingly for that one. Now it’s time for the dress code during an interview. Almost every job will want you to come in dressed business professional.

Even if they don’t say it, a common saying in business is that it is better to be overdressed than under dressed. For those who don’t know, business professional is a suit collared button down shirt with a suit jacket that matches the dress pants and a tie. I understand you might not already have a suit or that you don’t have the money to buy one. Some companies might understand and in that case you can just come in business casual which is business professional but without the suit jacket. If the company insists you be business professional which is understandable as you might need a suit during your job, such as if you’re visiting a client or on a company dinner. Then a possible substitute is to get one from Goodwill as they usually have an okay selection of them and can actually still be in pretty good condition. This is of course like a flat tire where it should only last you until you have the money to replace it with a real suit.

Now before the interview you should know exactly where the interview is happening at and any more specifics like if it’s in a specific room. If you are supposed to arrive at 10:00AM, leave so that you get there anytime from 8:00AM – 9:00AM. This will leave you plenty of time in case you get stuck in traffic, lost, or need to stop for something. The great part about getting there early is that you can continue to practice for the interview. One way of practicing is by looking up common asked interview questions so that you can be more confident going into the interview.

Now during the interview you’re going to want to shake every persons hand in the room whether there are two people or twenty. With the handshake make sure to have a firm grasp and go directly in, not from an upper angle or lower angle. Seems petty but some people think if you are coming in for the handshake from an upper angle, it’s you trying to show dominance. When shaking hands make sure to look the person in the eyes and introduce yourself. Then when you begin your interview make sure to calm yourself down. This will help you not to ramble on answers and or forget answers. If the interviewer asks a tough question, you don’t have to respond right away. Ask them if you can take a second to think about the answer. Most interviewers will like that you are willing to think first instead of going right into the answer. After the interview, the interviewer will ask if you have any questions. NEVER SAY NO! That can ruin your entire interview because most interviewers are waiting for questions and asking none can leave them with a bad taste in their mouth. Make sure to have 2-3 pre-planned questions and then try to think of 2-3 questions during the interview. That way you can easily ask three or four questions. After you’re done with questions make sure to shake everyone’s hand again and thank them for their time. If you do all of these things correctly, there shouldn’t be a single employer who won’t hire you.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Daniel_J_McCurdy/2438403

The Pathfinder: How to Choose or Change Your Career for a Lifetime of Satisfaction and Success

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by Nicholas Lore

DO YOU JUMP OUT OF BED EVERY MORNING AND RUSH TO A JOB YOU LOVE?

Or is the work you once enjoyed now just a way to pay the bills? Perhaps you’re even doubting your career choice altogether. Let The Pathfinder guide you to a more engaging, fulfilling work life. Based on breakthrough techniques developed by Rockport Institute, an innovative and award-winning career-counseling network that has changed the lives of over 10,000 people, The Pathfinder offers invaluable advice and more than 100 self-tests and diagnostic tools that will help you choose an entirely new career — or view a current job from a new, more positive perspective. You’ll learn:

* How to design your new career direction step by step so that it fits your talents, personality, needs, goals, values, and is, at the same time, practical and attainable

* How to deal successfully with the “yeah but” voices in your head that keep you going back to the same old ill-fitting job, day after day

* How to land the perfect job in your new field, plus tips on writing a really exceptional résumé, personal marketing, and networking (even for those who hate to network)

Whether you’re a seasoned professional in search of a career change or a beginner just entering the working world, you want to make the right choices from the beginning. No matter where you are in your journey, if you want work to be more of a dance than a drag, The Pathfinder will expertly coach you through the process of designing a career you will love.

Sell Your Transferable Skills

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By Gordon Walter 

Though employment levels are rapidly improving, the competition for those jobs is often fierce.  Whether it is a seasonal job, an internship, or a full-time career position, employers are frequently surprised by the number of respondents to their advertising.  Make it easier for the hiring manager to see that you possess the skills they need.  Do this by identifying those skills (e.g., by looking for them in job advertising for the same or similar positions), and then selling them through your resume and cover letter.  Following is a list of the most popular skill areas sought by employers having broad application to multiple careers, jobs, etc.:

  1. Problem-Solving. People who can identify problems, find solutions and make decisions are needed in such fields as business administration, management consulting, public administration, science, medicine and engineering.
  1. Technical.  Technology is advanced in all industries.  Installation, testing and repair of electrical, electronic and mechanical equipment in fields such as engineering, telecommunications, and transportation requires people with advanced vocational-technical skills.
  2. People Relations.  Often, the success of a company depends upon how well people work together. It is the job of managers and administrators to understand people needs and how best to meet those needs within the confines of the employment environment.
  3. Computer Programming.  It almost goes without saying that understanding how to harness a computer’s power and programming it to meet the specific needs of a particular company can dramatically increase your employment options.
  4. Ability to Teach and Train.  We develop and collect more new data in a day than our ancestors did in a year.  As a result, there continues to be demand for people with teaching and training skills in the fields of education, social services, management and general commerce.
  5. Science and Math.  Great advances are made each day in the fields of science, medicine and engineering.  People skilled in the sciences and math are needed to provide support by doing computational tasks and analysis in these fields.
  6. Money Management.  It is essential to carefully plan and manage personal finances.  Investment brokers, security officers, retirement planners, accountants and CPAs require support staff with these skills to help meet this need.
  7. Information Management.  Knowledge is now seen as a major contributor to our economy, and individuals who possess the ability to manage information are critical. Systems analysts, information technologists, database administrators, knowledge managers, and telecommunication engineers are examples of positions utilizing information management skills.
  8. Language.  Organizations depend upon people with the ability to speak a number of languages.  Spanish and German have long been taught by many schools.  Having this skill can enhance your employment opportunities and compensation.
  9. Management.  Understanding how to run a company is in demand.  The ability to manage people, systems, resources and finances; to understand the needs of consumers and translating those needs into business opportunities is required by organizations large and small.
  10. Reliability.  Showing up for work on a regular basis is a very desirable trait.  If you historically had good attendance, and/or recognized for being a dependable contributor, do not be bashful about mentioning it in resume and cover letter content.

Perhaps you have skills on this list from work performed for volunteer jobs.  Do not be shy about including them in your resume.  Be creative and study job descriptions of positions to which you might apply.  Also, do not forget “softer” skills and attributes, such as listening and relationship building.  These never go out-of-style, and may give you the edge over another candidate when appropriately communicated.

Gordon Walter is semi-retired from a career in human resources management.  He currently is a Resume Writer for Monster.com, and NextJob.com.  In addition, Mr. Walter serves as an Adjunct Instructor in the School of Business at Washburn University in Kansas.

 

Job Search 101: Mindfulness

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Expert Author Ramona L. Clay Most people don’t take the time to think about their careers and plan accordingly.  Oftentimes, the focus is on “Getting The Job!”  Very few, strategically, think about how and why someone will hire them; as a result, many apply to jobs they have not a chance of getting – wasting time and energy. Mindfulness of one’s actions will guide one to the right solutions.

Case in point: Going to a job fair offers a lot of possibilities; however, success comes to those who are mindful and strategic.  Most Companies list the jobs they are recruiting for and someone will, inevitably, walk up and say “what are you hiring for?”  How much time would it take to really research the companies before you go to the job fair?  Come up with a game plan; so that when you approached the company representative – you have something of value to say. There is a process to the madness.  It is important to show “Mindfulness” if you’re serious about getting a job.

Oftentimes, companies develop a series of pre-screening questions to evaluate candidates who submit resumes.  It eliminates wasting time looking at candidates who are not qualified.  Some of the pre-screening questions may include years of experience; education; industry, etc.  The pre-requirements may be specific or general – depending on the position.  That is why it is so important to be mindful of the job you are applying for because the higher your resume ranks in skills and experience; the better the chances of you being called and considered for a position.  To avoid the “black-hole” affect “thoroughly” read the job description.

As a recruiter, I usually do not go below 80% of pre-screening assessments.  Companies can be selective because there are hundreds of applicants applying for the same position.  The larger the company the more competitive the position; so being mindful of how your skills and experience match-up with the job description is important.

Consider your skills and experience; working at a large corporation is equivalent to a university or college level playing field – you got to be good.  They are looking for premier candidates; most positions are highly-skilled and targeted in a specific niche or industry.  No longer do large corporations provide the training & nurturing like they did in the past.  They have colleges, universities, and trade schools to do that; however, they will offer internships to students, but they are looking for students who can perform well in both the workplace and school.

Mindfulness is also about being realistic.  It is similar to a truck driver applying for a position as a Product Designer.  He became so upset that no one got back to him that he called the Vice President and President of the company.  Of course, they were upset that no one got back to him, but when they realized the reality of the situation – that was it!

If you are seeking employment without a lot of experience or training; medium to small businesses are a perfect place to build your experience.  You can maximize your visibility and skills.  Most small to medium firms do not have the stringent hiring requirements that large corporations have; including getting hired quicker.  Most small to medium firms may not be at job fairs or post online because of budget constraint.  One has to be aware of local companies in their area.  There are openings all around us – the key is strategically being Mindful of these opportunities.

Ramona Clay; President/Owner, Global Staffing Partners has been a recruiter for over 20+ years.  Ms. Clay recruits for companies nationally & internationally.  She specializes in Diversity/Executive Search; Technology; and Healthcare staffing.  Her emphasis – across the board – is diversity and inclusiveness in the workplace. Global Staffing Partners is headquartered in Wilmington, DE. http://www.Global-Staffing-Partners.com.

Ms. Clay, author; Living with Joy, Startup Pro, and Living with Joy2, http://www.AnomarPublishing.com and soon-to-be release, The Job Makeover. Ms. Clay does Career Coaching and Job Makeover Workshops. Books are also available online Amazon.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Ramona_L._Clay/1783658